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Classics

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Album Review

There's something strangely melancholic about Ratatat's sophomore record, Classics. Something that rests behind the dancey drum machine beats and the quirky synths, or even the alternating guitars. Outwardly it's a fun album, triumphant and full of majestic refrains and riffs — you could play it for your indie rock friends if you wanted to get them to dance a little and were too afraid to play Daft Punk or Juan Atkins — but there's still something in it, introspection gracenoted between the intricate (but never too ornate or over-complicated or even lush) instrument layers and classical arpeggios, contemplation sitting in bittersweet descents and acoustic guitar chords, French cinema- and IDM-induced reflection, that makes it somehow all very sad. It's music for the soundtrack of a film in which even though the sky is clear — there is sun, an open road perhaps — the characters have difficulty smiling. Even the more "upbeat" songs, "Lex," "Tropicana," or "Wildcat," for example, never completely shed their pensive skins, rub off the dirt that smudges their bellies and faces. Classics is a record that demands a bit of attention, something to assure it that you hear each phrase, each contradiction, each sound as it enters and leaves. Something to assure it that you know the spaces in which little happens are as important as those that are full. There are no solos here: just the comings and goings of thoughts and feelings and sounds, and though there is a circularity to the album, it's not boring; rather it just allows time for everything that Ratatat are trying to convey to manifest itself fully. Through its subtlety, Classics celebrates the nature and resilience of the human spirit while simultaneously acknowledging its defects, everything and anything you could ever ask an album to be, and nothing more, which is just enough.

Customer Reviews

lalalala

I want to hug it.

Great Album

Ratatat's beats unlike any other. They speak to me even without lyrics. Each song is unique and classic.

The Boys Are Back In Town

With three years kneeling by their bedroom shrine to Thin Lizzy behind them, they're finally prepared to perpetrate their own "Jail Break." This side project of session whizzes Evan Mast and Mike Stroud relies primarily the kind of heavy riffs and slick breaks that'll make your Jager-Red Bull jump right out of your hand. Highlights include "Lex" a club track for those sweaty nights when the -EPIC- fader gets left at ten, and the silly yet irresistable "Wildcat" complete with it's own pack of growling panthers. Be advised that there's filler interspersed so might want to save your next Urban Outfitters and go for the singles.

Biography

Formed: 2001 in New York, NY

Genre: Electronic

Years Active: '00s, '10s

Formerly known as Cherry, New York's rock-meets-electronica duo Ratatat feature multi-instrumentalist/programmer Evan Mast and guitarist Mike Stroud. Mast was also the brains behind the pretty laptop pop of E*vax, and with his brother E*Rock he ran the indie electronic label Audio Dregs. Stroud also played, in the studio and on tour, with artists including Ben Kweller and Dashboard Confessional. Between these duties (and Mast's job as a graphic designer), the duo found time to work on their collaboration....
Full Bio
Classics, Ratatat
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