"Love" by Cloud Cult on iTunes

13 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cloud Cult's leader and singer, Craig Minowa, is a quick study on how music's being made these days. Cloud Cult's ninth album, Love, continues the indie band's evolution as a group capable of big songs and even grander productions. Any fan of modern alt-rock who's spent time listening to The Polyphonic Spree, The Arcade Fire, and their contemporaries knows just how complicated the arrangements can get. But they're not more complicated as Minowa's own life. In 2002, Minowa and his wife put their two-year-old son Kaidin to bed, and the boy never woke up. A decade of conflicting emotions has led to this cathartic collection; there's even an eerie track called "Catharsis." The theme, of sorts, is love. The instrumental "All the Things We Couldn't See" is heavier than many of the songs with lyrics. "It's Your Decision" juggles various melody lines and arrangements within its four-plus minutes; it has a sense of distracting oneself with many ideas to keep your mind off the one thing that matters most. For lightness, "Good Friend" gooses up a handclap-heavy arrangement with a festive horn section.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cloud Cult's leader and singer, Craig Minowa, is a quick study on how music's being made these days. Cloud Cult's ninth album, Love, continues the indie band's evolution as a group capable of big songs and even grander productions. Any fan of modern alt-rock who's spent time listening to The Polyphonic Spree, The Arcade Fire, and their contemporaries knows just how complicated the arrangements can get. But they're not more complicated as Minowa's own life. In 2002, Minowa and his wife put their two-year-old son Kaidin to bed, and the boy never woke up. A decade of conflicting emotions has led to this cathartic collection; there's even an eerie track called "Catharsis." The theme, of sorts, is love. The instrumental "All the Things We Couldn't See" is heavier than many of the songs with lyrics. "It's Your Decision" juggles various melody lines and arrangements within its four-plus minutes; it has a sense of distracting oneself with many ideas to keep your mind off the one thing that matters most. For lightness, "Good Friend" gooses up a handclap-heavy arrangement with a festive horn section.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5

46 Ratings

Heard First Listen

Konga,

Thanks to NPR, got to listen to Love, and it's a classic. Expect the classic Cloud Cult sound but mixed with a dash of love, giving you a pleasant sound with many string instruments and soft use with the drums. This album is easily one of the best Cloud Cult albums yet, and quite possibly the best album I've listened to this year.

Enjoy with Love

BEST CC ALBUM YET

Shae Reub,

My family per order this for my birthday, and it's the best present I got. I love Cloud Cult and the title really says it all. It's all about Love. This songs are beautiful. I especially love " The Show Starts Now"

About Cloud Cult

The experimental, environmentally conscious Cloud Cult began in the mid-'90s in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The band was initially the solo project of Craig Minowa, who launched Cloud Cult while he was pursuing a degree in environmental science, and also shining shoes and driving an ice cream truck, among other jobs. Minowa spent the bulk of 1995 recording The Shade Project, which included sounds produced by buckets, pans, and couch cushions. Additional musicians were recruited to play the material live, and Cloud Cult pushed the conventions of rock concerts by introducing "live painting" to their sets. During every show, members Connie Minowa and Scott West would complete a painting; the resulting artwork was then auctioned off upon the show's conclusion. Such creative flourishes would soon come to characterize Cloud Cult's music, green-minded philosophy, and live performances.

Following the release of The Shade Project, Minowa busied himself with the creation of Earthology Records. He housed the nonprofit label on his own organic farm, powered by geothermal energy and built partially from reclaimed wood and recycled plastic. In early 2000, he returned to music with Who Killed Puck? After the birth of his son, however, Minowa devoted the bulk of his time to family, recording, grant writing, and environmental activism.

With the sudden death of his son in February 2002, Minowa became reclusive and sought solace by writing a large volume of songs. Lost Songs from the Lost Years was released that summer as a retrospective compilation, and They Live on the Sun followed in 2003, featuring contributions from cellist Sarah Young and drummer Dan Greenwood. Both became permanent members of Cloud Cult, and the band added Mara Stemm on bass in January 2004. Aurora Borealis was released just six months later. For the supporting tour, Cloud Cult's shows included the aforementioned live painters, performance artists, back-screen video, and tables featuring information from nonprofit environmental organizations.

Advice from the Happy Hippopotamus was released June 2005, with the full live band now consisting of Minowa (vocals, guitar, keyboard), Greenwood (drums), Young (cello, keyboard), and Matthew Freed (bass, keyboard, percussion). Later, 2007's The Meaning of 8, 2008's Feel Good Ghosts (Tea-Partying Through Tornadoes), and 2010's Light Chasers found the band specifically addressing its own environmental concerns in song format. 2013 saw the release of ninth album Love. Later that year the band developed a discography-spanning set list for an all-acoustic tour. The recordings from one show were edited and mixed into the live album Unplug, which was released in spring of 2014. ~ Kenyon Hopkin

  • ORIGIN
    Duluth, MN
  • FORMED
    1995

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