8 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After releasing a string of brilliant but only moderately successful hard rock albums in the '70s, Scorpions redefined their sound on 1979’s Lovedrive. With the addition of lead guitarist Matthias Jabs, the German group found the lineup that would lead them into their most prosperous decade. Because they'd already played together for so long, Scorpions were notable for the diversity of their skills. As a time when heavy metal was in rapid fluctuation, the band could achieve steady marching rock (“Loving You Sunday Morning”), proto-speed metal (“Another Piece of Meat,” “Can’t Get Enough”), and galloping Teutonic attacks (“Lovedrive”). In between there's the eerie balladry of “Almost Somewhere”—a clear antecedent to Guns ‘N Roses’ “Don’t Cry”—and the catchy near-reggae of “Is There Anybody There?,” which cleverly interpolates The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby.” While Scorpions would soon become synonymous with pounding riff-rock, the fan favorite “Holiday”—a sort of “Stairway to Heaven” for the New Wave of British Heavy Metal—shows they had enough musical imagination to become the next generation’s Led Zeppelin.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After releasing a string of brilliant but only moderately successful hard rock albums in the '70s, Scorpions redefined their sound on 1979’s Lovedrive. With the addition of lead guitarist Matthias Jabs, the German group found the lineup that would lead them into their most prosperous decade. Because they'd already played together for so long, Scorpions were notable for the diversity of their skills. As a time when heavy metal was in rapid fluctuation, the band could achieve steady marching rock (“Loving You Sunday Morning”), proto-speed metal (“Another Piece of Meat,” “Can’t Get Enough”), and galloping Teutonic attacks (“Lovedrive”). In between there's the eerie balladry of “Almost Somewhere”—a clear antecedent to Guns ‘N Roses’ “Don’t Cry”—and the catchy near-reggae of “Is There Anybody There?,” which cleverly interpolates The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby.” While Scorpions would soon become synonymous with pounding riff-rock, the fan favorite “Holiday”—a sort of “Stairway to Heaven” for the New Wave of British Heavy Metal—shows they had enough musical imagination to become the next generation’s Led Zeppelin.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
171 Ratings

171 Ratings

Smilin' Skull Ring ,

Not Bubble Gum Pop

Just download "Loving You Sunday Morning," set the equalizer to "Rock," and discover why the late 1970s was the time to be a teenage guy. Oh, and this album cover is my all-time favorite. This album proved that all amps really should go to "11." This is definitely one higher than most... I'm having flashbacks ...to that 8-Track tape player in my 1971 Ford Pinto, forest green, with thumpin' Pioneer speakers forced into the steel doors... with a craving for Van Halen and a girlfriend who wanted to marry Bon Scott. Whoa.

Voodoo-U ,

5 Star

I missed Roth's guitar craft but Michael Schenker made up for it on this album. The band took a major turn in direction and became more commercial but who cares. The next three albums from these guys ended up being metal classics. I'm very disappointed that iTunes doesn't have the classic Scorpions albums like In Trance, Virgin Killer or Taken by Force. Those albums were more classic rock but incredible. Check them out.

PBassMan ,

One of the Best

IMO the peak of Scorpion songwriting. The addition of Michael S. put the songs over the top. Holiday is one of the best heavy metal ballads of all time. Coast to Coast kicks and its overall feel is reminiscent of The Zoo, which is found on Animal Magnitism. I spun this record so many times I wore out the grooves.

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