8 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is where New Order truly came into its own. Dance rhythms and innovative synth textures give 1985's Low-Life a springy step not found in Joy Division, nor in New Order's debut; they wear happiness well. The doom and gloom of previous records is tempered by a hopeful sense of yearning, and the harmonica-led (no, really) anti-war ballad "Love Vigilantes" branches into tragicomedy. The club hit "The Perfect Kiss" is as good for karaoke as it is for dancing, and the stately "Elegia" is a masterfully ambivalent mood piece.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is where New Order truly came into its own. Dance rhythms and innovative synth textures give 1985's Low-Life a springy step not found in Joy Division, nor in New Order's debut; they wear happiness well. The doom and gloom of previous records is tempered by a hopeful sense of yearning, and the harmonica-led (no, really) anti-war ballad "Love Vigilantes" branches into tragicomedy. The club hit "The Perfect Kiss" is as good for karaoke as it is for dancing, and the stately "Elegia" is a masterfully ambivalent mood piece.

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