11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Not quite brooding, but imbued with atmosphere and mood, the debut from L.A.’s Low vs. Diamond is dramatic, yet tastefully restrained, with its sweeping guitars, accents of pianos and keyboards, and warm, unpretentious vocals.  The collection succeeds right off in giving us a few radio friendly tracks that should have some shelf life without wearing out their welcome. The military, twitchy crunch  of “Killer B,” the lush guitar and Bryan Ferry-ish vocal swells of “Heart Attack” and the introspective demi-ballad, “This Is Your Life,” seem destined for airplay right next to Coldplay or the Doves. Perhaps too big for radio,  “Actions Are Actions” is a huge, emotional outpouring to a longtime friend or relative, with searing guitars lifting lyrics like, “I won’t turn my face and look away/ I still care about you /so desperately lost and you’re hurting us all /you don’t know the cost.” Vocalist Lucas Field has just the right touch with such plainspoken words placed clearly in the final mix; his style and tone are immediately appealing, and you want to hear what he is saying. Low vs. Diamond is a young band with a mature heart and lush vision, qualities which may well portend an interesting and prolific future.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Not quite brooding, but imbued with atmosphere and mood, the debut from L.A.’s Low vs. Diamond is dramatic, yet tastefully restrained, with its sweeping guitars, accents of pianos and keyboards, and warm, unpretentious vocals.  The collection succeeds right off in giving us a few radio friendly tracks that should have some shelf life without wearing out their welcome. The military, twitchy crunch  of “Killer B,” the lush guitar and Bryan Ferry-ish vocal swells of “Heart Attack” and the introspective demi-ballad, “This Is Your Life,” seem destined for airplay right next to Coldplay or the Doves. Perhaps too big for radio,  “Actions Are Actions” is a huge, emotional outpouring to a longtime friend or relative, with searing guitars lifting lyrics like, “I won’t turn my face and look away/ I still care about you /so desperately lost and you’re hurting us all /you don’t know the cost.” Vocalist Lucas Field has just the right touch with such plainspoken words placed clearly in the final mix; his style and tone are immediately appealing, and you want to hear what he is saying. Low vs. Diamond is a young band with a mature heart and lush vision, qualities which may well portend an interesting and prolific future.

TITLE TIME
4:09
4:36
4:05
4:40
5:07
3:26
4:38
3:51
3:48
2:50
3:50

About Low vs Diamond

The beginnings of Los Angeles' Low vs Diamond can be traced to early 2002 at the University of Colorado, where lead singer/guitarist Lucas Field, drummer Howie Diamond, and keyboardist Tad Moore (birth name: James Thaddeus Moore IV) were undergrads. The three played together in a jam band in between studying and classes, and when graduation day came and went, the guys relocated themselves to the City of Angels. During school, the group had begun absorbing a diversity artists outside of Dave Matthews and Phish -- such as David Bowie, Roxy Music, Brian Eno, Serge Gainsbourg, and Air -- which led them to consequently abandon their pseudo-hippie ways for more dark and airy indie rock terrain once they settled into their new L.A. digs. Various bandmember and name changes unsurprisingly occurred during the process (including 1984 and Colored Shadows, the latter moniker under which the band issued two EPs) before finally agreeing on the name Low vs Diamond, supposedly as a joke relating to Diamond's incessant fighting with an ex-member's difficult girlfriend, nicknamed Low. With players Anthony Polcino (guitar/vocals) and Jon Pancoast (bass) eventually in tow, Low vs Diamond played gigs all around Los Angeles and readied material to lay down in the studio. They recorded a demo in mid-2006, which quickly caught the ear of Dominic Hardisty, the man responsible for signing an unknown Las Vegas band named the Killers a few years prior. The quintet wasted no time in impressing him further and was subsequently signed to Hardisty's U.K.-based Marrakesh label after only seeing them play one live show. The band's debut EP, Life After Love, was released in February 2007 to positive response, and Low vs Diamond's highly praised performances continued to generate area buzz and hype in the blogosphere. They graduated to the majors when Sony signed them and released a digital version of their self-titled debut album in April of 2008. ~ Corey Apar

  • ORIGIN
    Los Angeles, CA

Songs

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