10 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Wrapping up their career after 12 productive years, Anberlin turn Lowborn into a compelling final statement of artistic ambition and unshakable belief. Nearly all aspects of this Florida Christian pop/rock quintet’s protean sound can be heard in these tracks, engineered by longtime studio partners Aaron Sprinkle, Matt Goldman, and Aaron Marsh. The band’s sonic complexity—ranging from quietly introspective pieces to furious punk outbursts and sleek new wave excursions—are unified by thoughtfully fervent lyrics that don’t flinch at posing hard spiritual questions. Lead singer Stephen Christian tailors his vocal approach to the content of the tunes, raging with prophetic anger on “We Are Destroyer,” capturing an awe-struck reverence on “Atonement,” and embracing a higher love on “Losing It All.” Lowborn's music is even more diverse, surging with ‘80s-style pop elegance (“Stranger Ways”) before exploding with hardcore violence (“Dissenter”) and finally resting in contemplative glory (“Harbinger”). There’s an ultimate faith in redemption that shines through, giving Anberlin’s valedictory offering a healing, deeply humane glow.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Wrapping up their career after 12 productive years, Anberlin turn Lowborn into a compelling final statement of artistic ambition and unshakable belief. Nearly all aspects of this Florida Christian pop/rock quintet’s protean sound can be heard in these tracks, engineered by longtime studio partners Aaron Sprinkle, Matt Goldman, and Aaron Marsh. The band’s sonic complexity—ranging from quietly introspective pieces to furious punk outbursts and sleek new wave excursions—are unified by thoughtfully fervent lyrics that don’t flinch at posing hard spiritual questions. Lead singer Stephen Christian tailors his vocal approach to the content of the tunes, raging with prophetic anger on “We Are Destroyer,” capturing an awe-struck reverence on “Atonement,” and embracing a higher love on “Losing It All.” Lowborn's music is even more diverse, surging with ‘80s-style pop elegance (“Stranger Ways”) before exploding with hardcore violence (“Dissenter”) and finally resting in contemplative glory (“Harbinger”). There’s an ultimate faith in redemption that shines through, giving Anberlin’s valedictory offering a healing, deeply humane glow.

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