16 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like hearing a stranger overshare on the bus, it's impossible to ignore Juice WRLD's laments. On his major-label debut, the Chicago rapper processes a nasty breakup by plunging into the depths of his grief and regret. Much like the late Lil Peep, he uses emo and trap as primary tools, with blown-out, sing-song Auto-Tune vocals accompanied by depth-charge beats and spare guitar. He lashes out on tracks like “All Girls Are the Same” and “Lucid Dreams” (“I was tangled up in your drastic ways/Who knew evil girls have the prettiest face?") until he numbs the pain with intoxicants and dark nihilism (“Candles,” “Hurt Me”). Though the project ends on a hopeful note on “I'll Be Fine” (“Too busy making money to worry 'bout making memories”), we still can’t wait for the ex's mixtape response.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like hearing a stranger overshare on the bus, it's impossible to ignore Juice WRLD's laments. On his major-label debut, the Chicago rapper processes a nasty breakup by plunging into the depths of his grief and regret. Much like the late Lil Peep, he uses emo and trap as primary tools, with blown-out, sing-song Auto-Tune vocals accompanied by depth-charge beats and spare guitar. He lashes out on tracks like “All Girls Are the Same” and “Lucid Dreams” (“I was tangled up in your drastic ways/Who knew evil girls have the prettiest face?") until he numbs the pain with intoxicants and dark nihilism (“Candles,” “Hurt Me”). Though the project ends on a hopeful note on “I'll Be Fine” (“Too busy making money to worry 'bout making memories”), we still can’t wait for the ex's mixtape response.

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