14 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Webber of Black Mountain/Lightning Dust, with a delivery wavering between hushed melancholy and a vigorous, nimble falsetto. Following her excellent 2008 debut EP (Even Born Again), Suburban Nature is an impressive and quietly exhilarating full-length, showing a surprisingly mature musician with an affinity for understatement and simplicity. (Now in her early 20s, Jaffe wrote many of these tunes as a teenager.) Tracks like “Wreaking Havoc” or “Before You Go” could have been overdressed in strings or pianos, but Jaffe keeps it simple. Her acoustic guitar is up front and center, playing support to her smart lyrics and heart-wrenching vocals. Cellos are bowed ever so faintly; violins are gently strummed and plucked; drums are stripped to their critical essence. She chases notes like a fluttering starling on “Better Than Nothing,” coos a pop lullaby on “Vulnerable,” and works up a folky troubadour froth on “Clementine.” “Pretender” is eerily beautiful, one of many memorable moments here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Webber of Black Mountain/Lightning Dust, with a delivery wavering between hushed melancholy and a vigorous, nimble falsetto. Following her excellent 2008 debut EP (Even Born Again), Suburban Nature is an impressive and quietly exhilarating full-length, showing a surprisingly mature musician with an affinity for understatement and simplicity. (Now in her early 20s, Jaffe wrote many of these tunes as a teenager.) Tracks like “Wreaking Havoc” or “Before You Go” could have been overdressed in strings or pianos, but Jaffe keeps it simple. Her acoustic guitar is up front and center, playing support to her smart lyrics and heart-wrenching vocals. Cellos are bowed ever so faintly; violins are gently strummed and plucked; drums are stripped to their critical essence. She chases notes like a fluttering starling on “Better Than Nothing,” coos a pop lullaby on “Vulnerable,” and works up a folky troubadour froth on “Clementine.” “Pretender” is eerily beautiful, one of many memorable moments here.

TITLE TIME
3:26
2:48
4:50
3:54
3:41
3:22
4:55
2:35
2:40
2:48
4:18
3:25
2:14
2:38

About Sarah Jaffe

A singer/songwriter with electro-pop ambitions, soulful Texas crooner Sarah Jaffe weaves stark folk-pop narratives whose gentle melodies belie the deeper, dancefloor-ready confectioner within. On the title track of her debut EP, Jaffe sang "I'm testament to old and new," which served as a nice introduction to the singer/songwriter's timeworn folk side. Her tart, at times bluesy voice had the sepia tint of dustbowl troubadours of yore and the sad crack and throb of a '70s confessional folkie. Delicate guitar picking and literate lyrics rounded out the aesthetic, but Jaffe also proved to be capable of kicking up a full-band rumble as well, with albums like Suburban Nature pointing to a decidedly punky force behind the quiet façade.

Born in 1986 in Texas, Jaffe burst onto Denton's indie scene in a big way during the late 2000s, making memorable live appearances at venues like the Austin City Limits festival and winning recognition in several categories at the Dallas Observer Music Awards. Raves for her initial EP, 2008's Even Born Again, in the American and U.K. press, as well as an international tour supporting the band Midlake, raised the singer's profile even further, and she signed a deal with Kirtland Records late in 2009, who released the full-length Suburban Nature as her official debut in 2010. The home-recorded The Way Sound Leaves a Room EP arrived in 2011, followed by the evocative full-length The Body Wins in 2012 and the electro-pop-minded Don't Disconnect in 2014. ~ Paula Carino & Steve Leggett

  • ORIGIN
    Red Oak, TX
  • BORN
    January 29, 1986

Songs

Albums

Top Videos

Listeners Also Played