22 Songs, 1 Hour 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This double LP was the first compilation of The Doors’ music released after singer Jim Morrison’s 1971 death. It avoided duplicating the hits that appeared on their 1970 greatest-hits collection, 13, and included high-profile tracks and deep cuts from the group’s first six studio albums. In addition, two obscure b-sides—“Who Scared You” (the March 1969 flipside to “Wishful Sinful”) and a cover of Willie Dixon’s “(You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further” (the 1971 flipside of “Love Her Madly”)—were included, filling out the official tracks recorded and released with Jim Morrison. It should be noted that this modern reissue was overseen by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick, and the remixed versions of “Break On Through” and “The End” appear in place of the original mixes from 1967. Without most of the obvious hits, Weird Scenes reveals The Doors' darker, more experimental side, while songs like “Strange Days,” “The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat),” “The Spy,” and “When the Music’s Over” show the band’s FM-radio side.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This double LP was the first compilation of The Doors’ music released after singer Jim Morrison’s 1971 death. It avoided duplicating the hits that appeared on their 1970 greatest-hits collection, 13, and included high-profile tracks and deep cuts from the group’s first six studio albums. In addition, two obscure b-sides—“Who Scared You” (the March 1969 flipside to “Wishful Sinful”) and a cover of Willie Dixon’s “(You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further” (the 1971 flipside of “Love Her Madly”)—were included, filling out the official tracks recorded and released with Jim Morrison. It should be noted that this modern reissue was overseen by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick, and the remixed versions of “Break On Through” and “The End” appear in place of the original mixes from 1967. Without most of the obvious hits, Weird Scenes reveals The Doors' darker, more experimental side, while songs like “Strange Days,” “The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat),” “The Spy,” and “When the Music’s Over” show the band’s FM-radio side.

TITLE TIME

More By The Doors

You May Also Like