15 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As arguably the last band bearing the pop-punk torch, Sum 41 show with Underclass Hero that they can grow up without losing any of their rude and unruly appeal. It all begins with the fist-pumping anthem, “Underclass Hero,” which recycles the furious riffs from Sum’s breakthrough hit “Fat Lip” as it reiterates that song’s message: “We're here to represent / And spit right in the face of the establishment.” While Sum’s brand of rebellion may still have more to do with pantsing the security guard at the mall than storming the White House, the frustration they voice is heartfelt. When you get straight to the heart of the matter, what could be more succinct and comforting than “Confusion and Frustration In Modern Times?” As the album unfolds, songwriter Deryck Whibley remains as candid about his hatred for the current political leaders (“March of the Dogs,” “The Jester”), his fragmented family life (“Dear Father” and “Walking Disaster”) and his romantic relationships (“With Me,” “Best of Me”). After four albums, Sum 41 can still deliver the goods to their fans with more honesty and integrity than their critics ever thought possible.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As arguably the last band bearing the pop-punk torch, Sum 41 show with Underclass Hero that they can grow up without losing any of their rude and unruly appeal. It all begins with the fist-pumping anthem, “Underclass Hero,” which recycles the furious riffs from Sum’s breakthrough hit “Fat Lip” as it reiterates that song’s message: “We're here to represent / And spit right in the face of the establishment.” While Sum’s brand of rebellion may still have more to do with pantsing the security guard at the mall than storming the White House, the frustration they voice is heartfelt. When you get straight to the heart of the matter, what could be more succinct and comforting than “Confusion and Frustration In Modern Times?” As the album unfolds, songwriter Deryck Whibley remains as candid about his hatred for the current political leaders (“March of the Dogs,” “The Jester”), his fragmented family life (“Dear Father” and “Walking Disaster”) and his romantic relationships (“With Me,” “Best of Me”). After four albums, Sum 41 can still deliver the goods to their fans with more honesty and integrity than their critics ever thought possible.

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