13 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Patty Griffin has always had the vocal pipes. She has also shown great depth and versatility as a songwriter, able to squeeze emotion to the breaking point without settling for sentimentality. Flaming Red, Griffin’s second album, coming after the guitar and voice of Living With Ghosts, is her attempt to toughen up and try her hand at leading a more conventional and, therefore, commercial enterprise. While those familiar with her quieter and solemn moments will be taken aback by the unapologetic rock guitars that fuel “Tony” (the horror story of a young gay man’s suicide) and “Change,” those buckled in for the wilder ride will find a refreshing energy she rarely attempts anymore. Flaming Red represents an intriguing dimension for this singer-songwriter whose songs covered by the Dixie Chicks, Martina McBride and Reba McEntire have now aligned her with a country-tinged following. The shuffling, country strains of “Goodbye” (which McBride covered) are closer to the performer she’s become. But half the fun here is hearing Griffin toying with something like the adult-contemporary keyboards and guitars of “Carry Me. “ It makes for pleasant surprises.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Patty Griffin has always had the vocal pipes. She has also shown great depth and versatility as a songwriter, able to squeeze emotion to the breaking point without settling for sentimentality. Flaming Red, Griffin’s second album, coming after the guitar and voice of Living With Ghosts, is her attempt to toughen up and try her hand at leading a more conventional and, therefore, commercial enterprise. While those familiar with her quieter and solemn moments will be taken aback by the unapologetic rock guitars that fuel “Tony” (the horror story of a young gay man’s suicide) and “Change,” those buckled in for the wilder ride will find a refreshing energy she rarely attempts anymore. Flaming Red represents an intriguing dimension for this singer-songwriter whose songs covered by the Dixie Chicks, Martina McBride and Reba McEntire have now aligned her with a country-tinged following. The shuffling, country strains of “Goodbye” (which McBride covered) are closer to the performer she’s become. But half the fun here is hearing Griffin toying with something like the adult-contemporary keyboards and guitars of “Carry Me. “ It makes for pleasant surprises.

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About Patty Griffin

A singer and songwriter whose literate, impressionistic storytelling and richly evocative melodies have made her one of the best-respected artists in the contemporary folk community, Patty Griffin was born in Old Town, Maine on March 16, 1964. The youngest of seven children, Griffin was 16 years old when she bought her first guitar for $50. While Griffin learned to play, she showed no interest in making music a career in her teens and twenties; however, when her marriage broke up in 1992, Griffin, now living in Boston, developed a keener interest in writing songs, and was soon performing regularly at local coffeehouses. A&R people from A&M Records were impressed with Griffin's songs and soulful performing style, and she was signed to a record deal; early attempts to capture her sound in the studio didn't quite click, so her 1996 debut album, Living with Ghosts, was drawn from Griffin's original acoustic demo recordings. The 1998 follow-up, Flaming Red, teamed Griffin with a full band and a full-bodied production in sharp contrast to the spare sound of the debut. Griffin recorded an album in 2000 with producer Daniel Lanois called Silver Bell, but before it could be released, A&M was taken over by Universal in a corporate merger, and the album was put on the shelf while Griffin was left in limbo. Eventually, Griffin was released from her A&M contract, and she signed with ATO Records, the artist-friendly label founded by Dave Matthews, and ATO released 1000 Kisses in 2002. In 2003 Griffin released a live album, A Kiss in Time, and by this time she was gaining greater recognition as a performer, with her songs being recorded by Willie Nelson, the Dixie Chicks, Bette Midler, and Emmylou Harris, while Shawn Colvin, Miranda Lambert, Solomon Burke, and the Wreckers would follow suit over the next several years.

After releasing 2004's Impossible Dream, Griffin took three years off from the studio before returning with 2007's Children Running Through, which was named the year's best album by the Americana Music Association. In 2010 Griffin and her friend and collaborator Buddy Miller set up shop in Nashville's Downtown Presbyterian Church to record Downtown Church, a set of spiritually themed numbers, which won a Grammy for Best Traditional Gospel Album. That same year, Griffin took part in the recording sessions for Robert Plant's album Band of Joy, and she joined Plant's road band for the subsequent concert tour; Griffin also became the belated subject of music business gossip when she and Plant entered into a love affair that found the former Led Zeppelin singer briefly relocating to Austin, Texas, where she'd been living since the late '90s. By 2013 Griffin and Plant had gracefully parted ways, and she released the primarily acoustic set American Kid, a joint release between Columbia and New West Records. Also in 2013, Griffin's unreleased album Silver Bell finally received an official release (though the album had been circulating among fans for years), and her song "We Are Water" was performed by Hayden Panettiere on the hit TV series Nashville. In 2015 Griffin launched her own label, PGM, distributed by Thirty Tigers, and inaugurated the imprint with a new album, Servant of Love. ~ Mark Deming

  • ORIGIN
    Old Town, ME
  • BORN
    March 16, 1964

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