10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released at the height of the hippie era, Leonard Cohen’s darkly complex debut sounded unlike anything else at the time. On “Suzanne” and “Sisters of Mercy,” the poet-turned-musician comes across like a man wandering the dimly lit alleyways between alienation and despair. But what shouldn’t be overlooked is the sheer beauty in Cohen’s vision. The way the harpsichord in “Winter Lady” dances across his leaden voice is one of those delicious little moments that help make the album so unforgettable.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released at the height of the hippie era, Leonard Cohen’s darkly complex debut sounded unlike anything else at the time. On “Suzanne” and “Sisters of Mercy,” the poet-turned-musician comes across like a man wandering the dimly lit alleyways between alienation and despair. But what shouldn’t be overlooked is the sheer beauty in Cohen’s vision. The way the harpsichord in “Winter Lady” dances across his leaden voice is one of those delicious little moments that help make the album so unforgettable.

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