17 Songs, 1 Hour, 9 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Few contemporary reggae singers are as steeped in the history of Jamaica’s musical culture as veteran roots artist Glen Washington. When in the ‘70s he started to make his way as a singer and musician, he worked alongside childhood friends like Freddie McGregor, Beres Hammond, and others, and recorded his first hit, “Rockers ‘Nu’ Crackers” for Errol Thompson in 1976. Though he kept pursuing his musical ambitions, he didn’t record another appreciable hit until the early ‘90s, when he reemerged with “Resistance,” a powerful roots anthem cut on the celebratory “Cherry O Baby” rhythm. Washington has been experiencing a creative renaissance ever since, becoming something of a roots elder statesman. On Masterpiece, Washington teams with the Zion I Kings production team to produce another reliably excellent set of mellow lovers rock and socially conscious roots. The Zion I Kings are known for their heavy rhythms and vintage sonic aesthetic, and their relaxed productions perfectly match Washington’s gruff, care-worn vocals, particularly on the plaintive “Take Away the Whip” and the echo-laden “Dark Days Are Gone."

EDITORS’ NOTES

Few contemporary reggae singers are as steeped in the history of Jamaica’s musical culture as veteran roots artist Glen Washington. When in the ‘70s he started to make his way as a singer and musician, he worked alongside childhood friends like Freddie McGregor, Beres Hammond, and others, and recorded his first hit, “Rockers ‘Nu’ Crackers” for Errol Thompson in 1976. Though he kept pursuing his musical ambitions, he didn’t record another appreciable hit until the early ‘90s, when he reemerged with “Resistance,” a powerful roots anthem cut on the celebratory “Cherry O Baby” rhythm. Washington has been experiencing a creative renaissance ever since, becoming something of a roots elder statesman. On Masterpiece, Washington teams with the Zion I Kings production team to produce another reliably excellent set of mellow lovers rock and socially conscious roots. The Zion I Kings are known for their heavy rhythms and vintage sonic aesthetic, and their relaxed productions perfectly match Washington’s gruff, care-worn vocals, particularly on the plaintive “Take Away the Whip” and the echo-laden “Dark Days Are Gone."

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4:34
4:11
4:00
3:54
4:14
3:49
4:01
4:03
4:33
3:50
3:59
3:42
4:45
3:59
3:44
4:34
3:09

About Glen Washington

b. c.1957, May Pen, Clarendon, Jamaica, West Indies. Washington has been involved in the Jamaican music industry since the early 70s. He was taught to play drums in a band named Stepping Stone by Joseph Hill of Culture. Hill sang lead vocals with the band until a disagreement with the hotel management where the band was playing resulted in Washington filling the role. Washington’s connection with Hill resulted in a recording session at Joe Gibbs studio and the release of his vocal debut, ‘Rockers No Crackers’. Following the singing venture Washington returned to playing drums for Culture in session for the controversial Africa Stand Alone. The album met with mixed reviews and the drummer moved on, finding work on the North Coast where he performed at a hotel where Stevie Wonder was a guest. The Motown Records legend jammed with Washington and his band and in 1982 encouraged the singer to emigrate to the USA. Washington subsequently settled in Detroit and retired for a five-year period. When Leroy Sibbles of the Heptones toured the USA he sought out Washington in Detroit to play drums at a concert in the city. Following the performance Sibbles invited Washington to Canada where he played with his band and joined the Sattalites. After leaving the Sattalites Washington played drums for Shinehead in New York and embarked on an international touring schedule. Following his global jaunt Washington set up his own record label and released ‘Feel The Vibes’, which proved a minor hit in New York. The single led to various recording sessions including his overdue breakthrough at Coxsone Dodd’s other Studio One Recording studio based in Brooklyn. The Studio One success led to sessions in Jamaica with Lloyd Campbell who produced Get Next To Me. His success led to a glut of releases, including ‘Can’t Keep A Good Man Down’, ‘Careless Minded People’, ‘Breaking Up’, ‘The Love Of God’ and ‘Open Your Eyes’.

  • ORIGIN
    May Pen, Clarendon, Jamaica
  • BORN
    1957

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