17 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

NRBQ were always underrated as a studio act—as they produced their own records, the band were subtly brilliant. Yet at their core they were a bar band, which is why God Bless Us All is so important. Recorded on April 18, 1987, at Lupo’s Heartbreak Hotel, in Providence, R.I., this album is exuberant, good-time rock ‘n’ roll of the highest order. This band proved that reckless party music could still have soul, while their revivals of '50s-style R&B and rockabilly workouts showed that early American rock wasn't simply fodder for nostalgia but a vital American ritual. The wired-up power pop of “Crazy Like a Fox” and “Me and the Boys” is the sound on which NRBQ built their reputation. But the set’s true revelation is a slow cover of Billy Stewart’s sweet soul ballad “Sitting in the Park,” which the band had been playing since 1970. Terry Adams, the group’s longtime lead vocalist, leads his bandmates in a performance of garage-born grace and authentic sweetness.

EDITORS’ NOTES

NRBQ were always underrated as a studio act—as they produced their own records, the band were subtly brilliant. Yet at their core they were a bar band, which is why God Bless Us All is so important. Recorded on April 18, 1987, at Lupo’s Heartbreak Hotel, in Providence, R.I., this album is exuberant, good-time rock ‘n’ roll of the highest order. This band proved that reckless party music could still have soul, while their revivals of '50s-style R&B and rockabilly workouts showed that early American rock wasn't simply fodder for nostalgia but a vital American ritual. The wired-up power pop of “Crazy Like a Fox” and “Me and the Boys” is the sound on which NRBQ built their reputation. But the set’s true revelation is a slow cover of Billy Stewart’s sweet soul ballad “Sitting in the Park,” which the band had been playing since 1970. Terry Adams, the group’s longtime lead vocalist, leads his bandmates in a performance of garage-born grace and authentic sweetness.

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