16 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Texas singer/songwriter Ryan Bingham possesses a voice as parched and pitted as the landscapes his lyrics describe. The songs on his major label debut Mescalito (2007) convey the same sort of grim fatalism and smoldering romance that pervades the novels of Cormac McCarthy. Though classified as a maverick country artist, Bingham seems as much inspired by the blues-rock of the Beggar’s Banquet-era Rolling Stones as by Hank, Willie or Waylon. Such labels don’t really matter, tough. What counts is that the music here has a genuine feel, chronicling America’s wide open spaces from the bottom up. Mescalito works as a complete narrative, though certain tracks stand out — “Boracho Station” (a Spanish ballad of cracked loveliness), “Long Way from Georgia” (a drifter’s weary lament) and “Sunshine” (a rollicking, nearly delirious number). Bingham manages a rough-hewn love song with the almost-funky “Take It Easy Mama,” but more typical are lonesome highway sketches like “Ever Wonder Why” and “Ghost of Travelin’ Jones.” Marc Ford’s production and instrumental touches avoid extraneous polish. Bingham may be a relative youngster, but Mescalito bears the mark of a well-seasoned artist with an ageless road story to tell.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Texas singer/songwriter Ryan Bingham possesses a voice as parched and pitted as the landscapes his lyrics describe. The songs on his major label debut Mescalito (2007) convey the same sort of grim fatalism and smoldering romance that pervades the novels of Cormac McCarthy. Though classified as a maverick country artist, Bingham seems as much inspired by the blues-rock of the Beggar’s Banquet-era Rolling Stones as by Hank, Willie or Waylon. Such labels don’t really matter, tough. What counts is that the music here has a genuine feel, chronicling America’s wide open spaces from the bottom up. Mescalito works as a complete narrative, though certain tracks stand out — “Boracho Station” (a Spanish ballad of cracked loveliness), “Long Way from Georgia” (a drifter’s weary lament) and “Sunshine” (a rollicking, nearly delirious number). Bingham manages a rough-hewn love song with the almost-funky “Take It Easy Mama,” but more typical are lonesome highway sketches like “Ever Wonder Why” and “Ghost of Travelin’ Jones.” Marc Ford’s production and instrumental touches avoid extraneous polish. Bingham may be a relative youngster, but Mescalito bears the mark of a well-seasoned artist with an ageless road story to tell.

TITLE TIME
6:19
2:08
4:07
4:55
2:03
4:20
4:09
4:38
2:11
3:01
3:50
4:58
4:45
6:43
4:45
5:51

About Ryan Bingham

Americana singer/songwriter Ryan Bingham was raised in rural Texas, where years of hardscrabble ranch work and rodeo competitions would later lend a sense of authenticity to his music. Living alone since his mid-teens, Bingham shuttled back and forth between Southwestern border towns and relatives' homes, often sleeping in his truck after rodeo shows. It was during those treks that he began entertaining friends with the guitar, an instrument he'd learned at the age of 17 from a mariachi neighbor. Drawing inspiration from Bob Dylan, Marshall Tucker, and Bob Wills -- all of whom populated the jukebox of The Halfway Bar, a roadhouse owned by Bingham's uncle (whose musical tastes influenced those of his nephew) -- Bingham fashioned a road-weary sound that piqued the interest of a barroom proprietor in Stephenville, TX. Bingham was offered a weekly residency at the bar; soon after, he began issuing self-released albums like Lost Bound Rails and Wishbone Saloon. The material was brought to the attention of Nashville heavyweights Lost Highway Records, who signed Bingham and issued his major-label debut, Mescalito (featuring production by Marc Ford, former guitarist for the Black Crowes), in October 2007.

Mescalito was well received by critics, with Rolling Stone aptly comparing Bingham's raw, scratchy voice to that of "Steve Earle's dad." After supporting the album with ample tour dates, the songwriter reprised his relationship with Marc Ford, who produced 2009's Roadhouse Sun. Later that year, he joined another music veteran -- producer/songwriter T-Bone Burnett -- in contributing music to the film Crazy Heart. Revolving around the the attempted comeback of a down-and-out country singer, Crazy Heart became one of the year's highest-praised films and won a Golden Globe and an Oscar for "The Weary Kind," one of Bingham's original compositions written with T-Bone Burnett, the soundtrack's musical director and producer. Bingham and his band the Dead Horses followed it with the album Junky Star in September of 2010, produced by Burnett. Bingham left Lost Highway after three albums and released 2012's Tomorrowland, recorded in Malibu, CA and co-produced by Bingham and Justin Stanley, on Bingham's own newly created Axster Bingham Records imprint. ~ Andrew Leahey

  • ORIGIN
    Hobbs, NM
  • BORN
    Mar 31, 1981

Top Songs by Ryan Bingham

Top Albums by Ryan Bingham

Top Music Videos by Ryan Bingham

Listeners Also Played