11 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With an album cover that looks more like Paul Simon’s self-titled 1972 solo album than anything by his Bay Area band Birds & Batteries, frontman Mike Sempert considers Mid Dream a solo record, despite including his bandmates Colin Fahrner and Jill Heinke on drums and bass, respectively. Certain tracks here surely have a more direct approach than is his band’s style, but songs such as the title track, “Finest Line," and “Ms. Metronome” could easily be classified as Birds & Batteries by their sound. The leaner, direct rock of “Oceans of Rock and Roll” suggests a new day in the Sempert household, but it’s not followed up on until the album’s second half. “Ain’t I Good to You” puts acoustic guitar to good use in a sparse arrangement. “Survival” centers on piano and voice for a Jackson Browne–like tune, if Browne had a higher vocal range. Singer Sonya Cotton handles the female harmonies (that'd be the Rosemary Butler parts). “Recovery” plays as a startlingly direct confession that turns into a massive jam during the song’s second half. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

With an album cover that looks more like Paul Simon’s self-titled 1972 solo album than anything by his Bay Area band Birds & Batteries, frontman Mike Sempert considers Mid Dream a solo record, despite including his bandmates Colin Fahrner and Jill Heinke on drums and bass, respectively. Certain tracks here surely have a more direct approach than is his band’s style, but songs such as the title track, “Finest Line," and “Ms. Metronome” could easily be classified as Birds & Batteries by their sound. The leaner, direct rock of “Oceans of Rock and Roll” suggests a new day in the Sempert household, but it’s not followed up on until the album’s second half. “Ain’t I Good to You” puts acoustic guitar to good use in a sparse arrangement. “Survival” centers on piano and voice for a Jackson Browne–like tune, if Browne had a higher vocal range. Singer Sonya Cotton handles the female harmonies (that'd be the Rosemary Butler parts). “Recovery” plays as a startlingly direct confession that turns into a massive jam during the song’s second half. 

TITLE TIME
3:32
4:28
4:24
3:54
3:44
3:43
2:24
3:43
3:26
7:27

Songs

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