Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn't open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from Milestones by Miles Davis, download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC


Open iTunes to preview, buy, and download music.

Editors’ Notes

There are so many late-‘50s classics in the Miles Davis catalog that you can be forgiven for overlooking this extraordinary and aptly named 1958 effort. It was the first time that Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane recorded together under Davis, and the only time this sextet (also including pianist Red Garland, Paul Chambers, and the soon-to-depart Philly Joe Jones) would record. The album is also famous for its title track, the trumpeter’s first foray into the modal approach—and it sounds like it could have been cut at the later Kind of Blue session, even if the tempo is a bit peppy. The rest of the songs are blues variations coming from various composers. Highlights include the fast and furious “Dr. Jekyll,” with Davis channeling his inner Dizzy Gillespie. The strutting “Sid’s Ahead” is a real treat, with Coltrane working his magic on this blues. Davis is famous for his version of Monk’s “’Round Midnight,” but here he does a midtempo version of “Straight, No Chaser” with excellent results. Along with the six original cuts are three alternate takes that only sweeten the pot.

Customer Reviews

Another classic from 1958

Man, 1958 was an incredible year for modern jazz. The Blue Note and Prestige cats were blowing up a storm on the east coast, and the Contemporary and Pacific Jazz cats were cooling out like crazy. Beatniks were banging their bongos and smoking that stuff, and everything was just stone Kool. Another wild man named Ornette Coleman was starting up his thing in LA. Like, crazy, man.

THIS is my favorite Miles Davis record. Davis, Coltrane, Cannonball, and THE rhythm section of the ages. BUY!

CoolFreeHardBop - a certified Groovologist

Can Jazz (American acoustic improvised music) be played perfectly?

Great Arco Bass playing, you can hear Paul Chambers' solo clearer in these early recordings. Its reminiscent of Slam Stewart here, without the unison vocal.
His Pizzicato isn't bad either. Great trumpet playing by Miles Davis, like few others, especially on Dr. JACKLE (misnamed as Dr. Jekyll or again as Dr. Jackie in notes)
by Jackie McLean. Great Alto from Julian "Cannonball" Adderley and Tenor Sax playing from John Coltrane. Red Garland has all the right notes at the right time.
Great drumming by Philly Joe Jones. The rhythm section is among the strongest and tightest ever. This is great music regardless of genre!

Is this the greatest of Miles' groups? It was a more conservative time and in the 1950s, what we call Coltrane changes were dominant. Within the confines
of the fifties and sixties, there may have not been a greater quartet, quintet or sextet led by one musician. This recording taken with 'Round About Midnight are worth
more than the price of 2011 gold.

IMO, this recording is flawless, considering the time and maybe regardless of it.

Highlight of the album...

the whole album is the masterpiece, but be definately be sure to listen to Coltranes solo on the alternate version of Straight No Chaser where he plays 2000 notes in about 2 minutes.


Born: May 26, 1926 in Alton, IL

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s

Throughout a professional career lasting 50 years, Miles Davis played the trumpet in a lyrical, introspective, and melodic style, often employing a stemless Harmon mute to make his sound more personal and intimate. But if his approach to his instrument was constant, his approach to jazz was dazzlingly protean. To examine his career is to examine the history of jazz from the mid-'40s to the early '90s, since he was in the thick of almost every important innovation and stylistic development in the...
Full Bio