11 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Band of Horses’ sentimental songs may inspire you to run barefoot through grassy fields. Vocalist Ben Bridwell has been the sole continuous member since the group’s 2004 inception. However, each Horse earned songwriting credit on 2010’s GRAMMY®-nominated Infinite Arms, as they banded together to produce the majority of the album themselves. The result was a bucolic slice of Americana filled with folksy harmonies, rootsy country sounds, and alt-rock embellishments—a vibe that’s echoed on “Knock Knock,” the lead single from Band of Horses’ fourth studio album, Mirage Rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Band of Horses’ sentimental songs may inspire you to run barefoot through grassy fields. Vocalist Ben Bridwell has been the sole continuous member since the group’s 2004 inception. However, each Horse earned songwriting credit on 2010’s GRAMMY®-nominated Infinite Arms, as they banded together to produce the majority of the album themselves. The result was a bucolic slice of Americana filled with folksy harmonies, rootsy country sounds, and alt-rock embellishments—a vibe that’s echoed on “Knock Knock,” the lead single from Band of Horses’ fourth studio album, Mirage Rock.

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Customer Reviews

3 out of 5

363 Ratings

The Disappointment

Expecting,

Well Band of Horses have hit their creative road block and have not found a way past. Their first two albums were an incredible experience all the way through. Infinite Arms had mixed reactions. I thought it was very good. Some songs were skipped but songs such as the title track and Older were some of the best BoH have recorded. This album, I feel, loses all sparkle in every way. I streamed the album before its release several times, hoping to grow on it. But I did not. I couldn't get over how basic the songs were musically and lyrically. I can't help but think of a bad Strokes/Shins cover band. This is, in no way, a "band maturing". An example of how stale the music has become is looking at the single Knock Knock. The band jams one the root chord for about 30 seconds each verse. Nothing but the vocals are doing anything. The bass, drums, and guitar are all hammering out one chord before going to a not-so-catchy chorus. This album has hardly any substance. This upsets me because I truly was looking forward to this release. I love Band of Horses so much, and this album is better music than a lot of what you could be listening to. However, compared to their past efforts, this album disappoints so much. Luckily I have The Killers and Grizzly bear to cheer me up. I'll stay tuned for the next album Band of Horses, but I hope it will be more inspired..

This is a sad day

goscha7452,

Well I hate to say I saw it coming with Infinite Arms. This band has turned into something I thought they were too good to stoop to. I guess it makes sense for them to be touring with MMJ since they have both gone to crap. If you are a "Cease To Begin" and "Everything All the Time" fan you understand this. Honestly I think those two albums were the pinnacle of BOH. Now its like America, The Beach Boys and Elvis Costello made an ugly baby. Sorry guys. I've been a fan since 06', I saw you in Queen Anne when you were nothing, but that was a better time for your music.

About Band of Horses

Emerging in 2004 with a blend of woodsy midtempo rock and reverb-laden vocals, Band of Horses gained an audience in their native Northwest before Everything All the Time made them indie rock darlings. Multi-instrumentalists Ben Bridwell and Mat Brooke founded the group after an eight-year run with Carissa's Wierd, and an early concert alongside future labelmates Iron & Wine caught the attention of Sub Pop Records. Sub Pop signed Band of Horses in 2005 and reissued their self-released EP later that year, while the band retreated to the studio to record its full-length debut. Everything All the Time appeared in March 2006 and was warmly received; however, Brooke did not tour in support of the album and had officially left the group by July, choosing instead to devote his time to another Sub Pop act, Grand Archives. Bridwell soldiered on with now-permanent bandmates Rob Hampton (bass) and Creighton Barrett (drums), playing stateside shows and touring Europe in support of the band's debut.

The bandmembers returned to the States and relocated to Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina to be closer to their families. Soon after, Band of Horses entered the studio with producer Phil Ek (who also helmed Everything All the Time) to record their second album. Cease to Begin was released in October 2007 to extremely warm reviews; it also peaked at number 35 on the Billboard charts, giving the band a taste of commercial success as well as critical approval. Although Band of Horses spent most of the following two years on the road, they also found time to return to the recording studio, where they began working on a third album in 2009.

This time, the band's five members all contributed to the songwriting process, making Infinite Arms a collaborative effort between Bridwell, Barrett, and new members Ryan Monroe, Tyler Ramsey, and Bill Reynolds. The album hit shelves in mid-2010, marking the band's first effort for Columbia Records and earning a Grammy for its country-rock sound. Preferring to take a more grounded approach on their fourth long-player, the group tapped legendary producer Glyn Johns (the Rolling Stones, the Who), who helped to rein in some of the group's more experimental tendencies by insisting on a more intimate live approach. The resulting Mirage Rock, which was preceded by the single "Knock, Knock," arrived in September 2012. Early 2014 saw the release of the live album Acoustic at the Ryman, a compilation of tracks recorded in a stripped-down fashion during a two-night stint in the spring of 2013 at Nashville's Ryman Auditorium.

While working on material for their fifth studio album, Bridwell teamed with fellow Columbia, South Carolina native Sam Beam of Iron & Wine to release a covers album titled Sing Into My Mouth in 2015. The record featured common song influences from the likes of Talking Heads, John Cale, and Sade. In the spring of 2016, Band of Horses debuted a new single, "Casual Party," from their forthcoming fifth studio LP, Why Are You OK? Released in June of that year via Interscope and Rick Rubin's American Recordings, the album was co-produced by Grandaddy's Jason Lytle with Rubin acting as executive producer. ~ Andrew Leahey

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