12 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran saxophonist Charles Lloyd impressed with his 2008 release, Rabo de Nube, an album that featured a crack quartet composed of Lloyd, pianist Jason Moran, bassist Reuben Rogers, and drummer Eric Harland. The 2010 follow-up, Mirror, has the same group on board, and the album does not disappoint: the playing is sharply focused and the choice of material is superb. Lloyd, best known for his work on tenor saxophone, pulls out his alto for a tender rendition of “I Fall In Love Too Easily.” The Los Angeles native was a guest artist on albums by West Coast rock bands such as the Doors, Canned Heat, and the Beach Boys; here he covers the lovely Brian Wilson song “Caroline, No” in a swinging, lyrical version. Two pieces by Thelonious Monk, “Monk’s Mood” and “Ruby, My Dear,” are played with great sensitivity; the traditional “The Water Is Wide” is imbued with deep gospel and blues feeling; and “Lift Every Voice and Sing” is taken outside in joyful fashion. The album closes with “Tagi,” one of four Lloyd originals, which includes a meditative spoken-word performance by Lloyd, who also plays blissed-out tones on his horn.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran saxophonist Charles Lloyd impressed with his 2008 release, Rabo de Nube, an album that featured a crack quartet composed of Lloyd, pianist Jason Moran, bassist Reuben Rogers, and drummer Eric Harland. The 2010 follow-up, Mirror, has the same group on board, and the album does not disappoint: the playing is sharply focused and the choice of material is superb. Lloyd, best known for his work on tenor saxophone, pulls out his alto for a tender rendition of “I Fall In Love Too Easily.” The Los Angeles native was a guest artist on albums by West Coast rock bands such as the Doors, Canned Heat, and the Beach Boys; here he covers the lovely Brian Wilson song “Caroline, No” in a swinging, lyrical version. Two pieces by Thelonious Monk, “Monk’s Mood” and “Ruby, My Dear,” are played with great sensitivity; the traditional “The Water Is Wide” is imbued with deep gospel and blues feeling; and “Lift Every Voice and Sing” is taken outside in joyful fashion. The album closes with “Tagi,” one of four Lloyd originals, which includes a meditative spoken-word performance by Lloyd, who also plays blissed-out tones on his horn.

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