Trouble In Paradise by The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band on Apple Music

9 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

This country-rock supergroup featuring David Souther (songwriter for The Eagles and Linda Ronstadt), Chris Hillman (Flying Burrito Brothers, The Byrds), and Richie Furay (Buffalo Springfield, Poco) hit paydirt on their 1974 self-titled debut album. This follow-up from the following year was a relative commercial flop—not because it was bad, but because the band were splitting at the seams. The suitably titled affair, produced by the legendary Tom Dowd, is a complete and engaging listen, full of sparkling country rock and hummable refrains. And Souther came into his own as songwriter and singer here; his folk-country “Mexico” is a weirdly alluring cheating-lover confessional; “Prisoner in Disguise” (later covered later by Linda Ronstadt) is an emotionally articulate ballad, and his rocking title song nearly steals the entire album. Hillman’s “Follow Me Through” is patented ’70s country-rock with a little funky breakdown and impassioned rock ’n’ roll guitar playing, and Furay’s gentle “For Someone I Love” rivals anything he did in Poco or Buffalo Springfield.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This country-rock supergroup featuring David Souther (songwriter for The Eagles and Linda Ronstadt), Chris Hillman (Flying Burrito Brothers, The Byrds), and Richie Furay (Buffalo Springfield, Poco) hit paydirt on their 1974 self-titled debut album. This follow-up from the following year was a relative commercial flop—not because it was bad, but because the band were splitting at the seams. The suitably titled affair, produced by the legendary Tom Dowd, is a complete and engaging listen, full of sparkling country rock and hummable refrains. And Souther came into his own as songwriter and singer here; his folk-country “Mexico” is a weirdly alluring cheating-lover confessional; “Prisoner in Disguise” (later covered later by Linda Ronstadt) is an emotionally articulate ballad, and his rocking title song nearly steals the entire album. Hillman’s “Follow Me Through” is patented ’70s country-rock with a little funky breakdown and impassioned rock ’n’ roll guitar playing, and Furay’s gentle “For Someone I Love” rivals anything he did in Poco or Buffalo Springfield.

TITLE TIME
5:05
3:03
2:56
3:14
2:59
3:40
4:51
3:50
3:49

About The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band

Formed in 1973 at the urging of Asylum Records president David Geffen, Souther-Hillman-Furay was the offspring of just about every notable country-rock band. Richie Furay was a founding member of both Buffalo Springfield and Poco; Chris Hillman had been with the Byrds, the Flying Burrito Brothers, and Stephen Stills' Manassas; and J.D. Souther formed Longbranch Pennywhistle with Eagle Glenn Frey, as well as recording a solo record for Asylum and penning tunes for artists like Linda Ronstadt, Bonnie Raitt, and the Eagles. S-H-F's supporting cast also came with impressive credentials, including studio stalwart Paul Harris on piano, Al Perkins (Flying Burrito Brothers, Manassas) on pedal steel guitar, and former Derek & the Dominos drummer Jim Gordon (who also wrote the piano piece that concludes "Layla").

Although the band, which was meant to be a sort of country-rock version of Crosby, Stills & Nash, received a great deal of hype and promotion, things never really gelled. Their debut sold reasonably well, but the aptly titled Trouble in Paradise was poorly received. S-H-F broke up shortly thereafter with each member going on to solo careers. Souther released a couple of solo efforts, achieving a minor success with "You're Only Lonely"; Hillman recorded unsuccessfully for Asylum before teaming with former Byrd-mates Roger McGuinn and Gene Clark in McGuinn, Clark & Hillman, and then forming the popular country-rock Desert Rose Band; and Furay, who became a minister in Colorado, made three Christian-influenced albums, as well as re-joining Poco for their 20th-anniversary recording. ~ Brett Hartenbach

  • ORIGIN
    Los Angeles, CA
  • FORMED
    1973

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