12 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the first notes of the bouncy, analog-synthesizer bass line that kick-starts the opening track, “This Life,” it’s clear that MercyMe is bringing a bit of the ‘80s into the 21st century with its new album, The Generous Mr. Lovewell. The collection offers other styles, from the title track’s sunshine pop to the adult-alternative rocking of “Move” to the Eno/Lanois-worthy ambience of the closing track, “This So Called Love.” But the big drums and choruses of “All of Creation,” the explorative guitar work at the front and back of “Only You Remain,” and the power-keyboarding of “Free” take listeners back to a time when hair mousse and primitive drum machines were the norm. The group’s lyrical messages remain strong and present, as heard in the narrative and musical power of the touching “Won’t You Be My Love.” And to get a glimpse of how the magic was created, there’s an exclusive iTunes bonus video of in-studio footage.

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the first notes of the bouncy, analog-synthesizer bass line that kick-starts the opening track, “This Life,” it’s clear that MercyMe is bringing a bit of the ‘80s into the 21st century with its new album, The Generous Mr. Lovewell. The collection offers other styles, from the title track’s sunshine pop to the adult-alternative rocking of “Move” to the Eno/Lanois-worthy ambience of the closing track, “This So Called Love.” But the big drums and choruses of “All of Creation,” the explorative guitar work at the front and back of “Only You Remain,” and the power-keyboarding of “Free” take listeners back to a time when hair mousse and primitive drum machines were the norm. The group’s lyrical messages remain strong and present, as heard in the narrative and musical power of the touching “Won’t You Be My Love.” And to get a glimpse of how the magic was created, there’s an exclusive iTunes bonus video of in-studio footage.

TITLE TIME
12

More By MercyMe

You May Also Like