10 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time Ray Wylie Hubbard released The Ruffian's Misfortune, the 68-year-old alt-country godfather had achieved almost mythological status in the Americana realm. Surrounded by blues-soaked barbed-wire guitar licks, Hubbard sounds like an apocalyptic Texas preacher invoking otherworldly powers on album-opener "All Loose Things." But his salutes to blues players Charlie Musselwhite ("Mr. Musselwhite's Blues") and Jessie Mae Hemphill ("Jessie Mae"), not to mention the unnamed rock & roll femme fatale of "Chick Singer Badass Rockin'," underline the fact that he remains as earthy and earthly as ever.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time Ray Wylie Hubbard released The Ruffian's Misfortune, the 68-year-old alt-country godfather had achieved almost mythological status in the Americana realm. Surrounded by blues-soaked barbed-wire guitar licks, Hubbard sounds like an apocalyptic Texas preacher invoking otherworldly powers on album-opener "All Loose Things." But his salutes to blues players Charlie Musselwhite ("Mr. Musselwhite's Blues") and Jessie Mae Hemphill ("Jessie Mae"), not to mention the unnamed rock & roll femme fatale of "Chick Singer Badass Rockin'," underline the fact that he remains as earthy and earthly as ever.

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