13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mario was only 15 when he recorded his debut album, and now with Go! we are starting to get a sense for what kind of artist he’ll grow up to be. As his young R&B peers edge closer to hip-hop in both attitude and content, Mario is more interested in making mature R&B in the tradition of Brian McKnight and Keith Sweat, who co-produced (with Teddy Riley) the simmering “Right and a Wrong Way.” That isn’t to say that Mario is for the old folks; Go! brings a crew of current hitmakers on board for support. Though the Akon-produced “Do Right” feels too much like an Akon song, and the Neptunes contribution “Go” sounds like it was tailored for Usher, the dazzling Polow Da Don production “Crying Out For Me” offers a crawling beat over which Mario showcases his sensitive side. Rich Boy shows up for the dizzying “Kryptonite,” and Juelz Santana appears on “Let Me Watch,” which is a little too sleazy for its own good. Mario sounds most like himself on songs like “How Do I Breathe,” in which he plays a love-stricken guy pining over the loss of his woman. The singer might do well to leave the sex songs and club hits to his contemporaries; whether he knows it or not, he’s growing into a sensitive soul man.

Explicit

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mario was only 15 when he recorded his debut album, and now with Go! we are starting to get a sense for what kind of artist he’ll grow up to be. As his young R&B peers edge closer to hip-hop in both attitude and content, Mario is more interested in making mature R&B in the tradition of Brian McKnight and Keith Sweat, who co-produced (with Teddy Riley) the simmering “Right and a Wrong Way.” That isn’t to say that Mario is for the old folks; Go! brings a crew of current hitmakers on board for support. Though the Akon-produced “Do Right” feels too much like an Akon song, and the Neptunes contribution “Go” sounds like it was tailored for Usher, the dazzling Polow Da Don production “Crying Out For Me” offers a crawling beat over which Mario showcases his sensitive side. Rich Boy shows up for the dizzying “Kryptonite,” and Juelz Santana appears on “Let Me Watch,” which is a little too sleazy for its own good. Mario sounds most like himself on songs like “How Do I Breathe,” in which he plays a love-stricken guy pining over the loss of his woman. The singer might do well to leave the sex songs and club hits to his contemporaries; whether he knows it or not, he’s growing into a sensitive soul man.

Explicit
TITLE TIME
3:47
4:48
3:58
3:49
4:13
3:36
3:49
3:42
3:35
5:11
4:24
4:02
3:25

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5

487 Ratings

487 Ratings

Worth The Wait

ryry707,

I've been waiting for this album to come out for about .... a year(I dowloaded the songs a year ago SERIOUSLy). I was listening to it on imeem and on that "album/playlist" which actually had different songs they were only two songs that i liked how do i breath and crying out for you. This album has has wayyy better songs i like music for love the most, but seriously there are other great songs buy it! i would have not bought the album if it was the album from imeem, this new realese is much BETTER. AmaZing R&B album, but it did not dowload two songs i dont know why. skippin and go. oh well the album is GREATTT.

Amazing

Braender,

YEa First To GEt It..lol ITS AMAZING MARIO IS AMAZING

ummmm

UnE415,

Tha album kinda suckz.... "Music for Love" is about da only song I would listen to. But da album is good for Junior High Kids who will grow up and look back at this music as a faze

About Mario

Born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, R&B vocalist Mario developed his natural talent while singing along with his mom using a karaoke machine at home. Discovered at the age of 11 in a local talent show, he later traveled to New York City to establish a career and scored a contract with Clive Davis' J label. Following his contribution to the Dr. Doolittle 2 soundtrack and a captivating performance of Stevie Wonder's "You and I" at Davis' Grammy party in February 2002, the newcomer was primed for stardom. At the age of 15, Mario debuted with the release of "Just a Friend 2002," produced by Warryn Campbell and based on rapper Biz Markie's hit "Just a Friend." His self-titled album followed in July, featuring contributions by Grammy-winning Alicia Keys. Turning Point, released in 2004, went to number two on the R&B album chart, hoisted by the ubiquitous smash "Let Me Love You," a single that also helped launch the career of Ne-Yo, the song's writer. The December 2007 release of Mario's third album, Go, was preceded by several delays and projected release dates; its initial date was November of the previous year. The album featured productions from Polow da Don, Timbaland, Stargate, the Neptunes, the Underdogs, and Akon. Go's last song, "Do Right," dealt with his relationship with his mother, a heroin addict. Just prior to its release, MTV aired I Won't Love You to Death: The Story of Mario and His Mom, a program documenting the pair's struggle. Go peaked at number four on the R&B chart, just prior to Mario's appearance on the sixth season of Dancing with the Stars. D.N.A., Mario's fourth album, was released in October 2009, with two of its songs, "Break Up" and "Thinkin' About You," already on the singles charts. ~ Drago Bonacich & Andy Kellman, Rovi

  • ORIGIN
    Baltimore, MD
  • BORN
    August 27, 1986

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