14 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kate Nash hasn’t left the angst of her teenage years behind. Instead she’s sharpened her attacks upon social cruelty and treacherous romance, using both stilettos and meat cleavers as weapons of choice. My Best Friend Is You surrounds the British singer/songwriter with an array of retro motifs, invoking the catty side of ‘60s girl group pop (“Do-Wah-Doo,” “Early Christmas Present”), the hyperactive gush of early punk (“Take Me to a Higher Plane”) and the tortured introspection of lo-fi rock (“You Were So Far Away”). Bernard Butler’s production matches thumping drums with chunky guitars and string washes, achieving particularly seamless results on the luminous “Paris” and the moody “I’ve Got a Secret.” Against these backdrops, Nash digs deep into her psyche to unleash such corrosive testimonies as “Don’t You Want to Share the Guilt?” and “Pickpocket.” “Mansion Song” — a scathing feminist rant paired with a tribal-beat track — rips into sexual stereotypes with real venom. At the other extreme is “I Hate Seagulls,” a love song of surprising fragility and hope.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kate Nash hasn’t left the angst of her teenage years behind. Instead she’s sharpened her attacks upon social cruelty and treacherous romance, using both stilettos and meat cleavers as weapons of choice. My Best Friend Is You surrounds the British singer/songwriter with an array of retro motifs, invoking the catty side of ‘60s girl group pop (“Do-Wah-Doo,” “Early Christmas Present”), the hyperactive gush of early punk (“Take Me to a Higher Plane”) and the tortured introspection of lo-fi rock (“You Were So Far Away”). Bernard Butler’s production matches thumping drums with chunky guitars and string washes, achieving particularly seamless results on the luminous “Paris” and the moody “I’ve Got a Secret.” Against these backdrops, Nash digs deep into her psyche to unleash such corrosive testimonies as “Don’t You Want to Share the Guilt?” and “Pickpocket.” “Mansion Song” — a scathing feminist rant paired with a tribal-beat track — rips into sexual stereotypes with real venom. At the other extreme is “I Hate Seagulls,” a love song of surprising fragility and hope.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
386 Ratings
386 Ratings
E-rocs ,

Not great at all

I loved her first album. But this one isn't good at all. There is no connection to her singing and the music or the lyrics. It sounds as if she got "cocky" cause her first album sold so well, and now she wants to "mature" to a more indie sound. The reason her first album was so great was the contradiction between happy music, with darker lyrics. Her voice falls gracefully into those songs. On this album she is just jump anywhere without notice or caution. It shows. None of these songs carry the same feeling as D*** Head, Merry Happy, or foundations.

office lover ,

good album

in my opinion, made of bricks is better. but this is a good album also. my favorites are Paris, Kiss the Grrrl, Don't You Want To Share the Guilt, Pickpocket, and I Hate Seagulls

MadCap356 ,

Darker and Deeper.

I'm not so sure if I like this album as much as Made Of Bricks because it's much, much darker. Her voice is still fantastic and her songs are still intriguing, but it's less happy and light than her first album. My favorite songs include Paris, Kiss That Grrrl, Don't You Want To Share The Guilt?, Do-Wah-Doo, Take Me To A Higher Plane, Later On, Pick Pocket, and I Hate Seagulls. I'm definitely not a huge fan of I Just Love You More. It's just a ton of screeching. Overall, this album is still amazing by an incredible artist. Honesty just radiates out of her voice, and it's easy for me to find my own meanings to her songs. You'll definitely enjoy this.

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