16 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though she opens with a symphonic countrified rendition of Delaney & Bonnie’s “God Knows I Love You,” the reason Nancy Sinatra’s eponymous 1969 album sounds like a departure from her earlier recordings is that she'd stopped working with her producer and mentor Lee Hazlewood. Though you might not notice his absence in the opener, there’s definitely something missing from the following “Memories” and even the minimally jazzy “Just Bein’ Plain Old Me.” But Sinatra more than makes up for it with “Here We Go Again,” as she really leans into her singing parts. It also helps that Nancy features some of the era’s top-shelf studio musicians, including Red Rhodes on pedal steel and the Wrecking Crew rhythm section of bassist Carol Kaye and drummer Hal Blaine, as well as guitarists Al Casey, Jerry McGee, and Billy Strange (who also sat in the producer’s chair). She endearingly honors her father, Frank, with “My Dad (My Pa),” singing over the spare accompaniment of Strange’s electric guitar playing. She also turns The Doors’ “Light My Fire” into orchestral cocktail jazz.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though she opens with a symphonic countrified rendition of Delaney & Bonnie’s “God Knows I Love You,” the reason Nancy Sinatra’s eponymous 1969 album sounds like a departure from her earlier recordings is that she'd stopped working with her producer and mentor Lee Hazlewood. Though you might not notice his absence in the opener, there’s definitely something missing from the following “Memories” and even the minimally jazzy “Just Bein’ Plain Old Me.” But Sinatra more than makes up for it with “Here We Go Again,” as she really leans into her singing parts. It also helps that Nancy features some of the era’s top-shelf studio musicians, including Red Rhodes on pedal steel and the Wrecking Crew rhythm section of bassist Carol Kaye and drummer Hal Blaine, as well as guitarists Al Casey, Jerry McGee, and Billy Strange (who also sat in the producer’s chair). She endearingly honors her father, Frank, with “My Dad (My Pa),” singing over the spare accompaniment of Strange’s electric guitar playing. She also turns The Doors’ “Light My Fire” into orchestral cocktail jazz.

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