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Who the F*** Are Arctic Monkeys? - EP

Arctic Monkeys

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Customer Reviews

Arctic Monkeys=Awesome.

I had heard some of the hype preceding their album, "Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not", but I thought that it might have been just another case of music snobs deciding that some random new band was the "genius" of the month. It's happened before. But the moment I bought that album, I knew that all the hype was spot-on. Their blend of dance-rock, punk, and even a little hip-hop gives them a sound that is unique and refreshing. And the songs! I must have listened to "Dance Floor" thirty times. This EP is no different. For some reason, it has "The View" on it, a track also on "Whatever", but, well... whatever. It's so good I can forgive it. If you like this kind of music, BUY THIS NOW. If you don't, go away. No one wants a "YUO SUUCCCKK" review with one star to ruin the rating.

Kind of Lackluster

I have bad news everyone: this is NOT, I repeat, NOT what you would expect from the band that just released "Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not". No, that album showed us that catchy music and great lyrics were still very possible with limited record company interference. This, however, just doesn't feel like the band we've all come to know and love. After the familiar "The View from the Afternoon", which is just as good as when I first heard it, we hear "Cigarette Smoker Fiona", which for some reason, just doesn't work. It doesn't help that Alex Turner's vocals are dubbed once so we can hear him harmonize with himself. This is mainly because the charm of the Arctic Monkeys was that they can make great music while maintaining a "We can make it on our own" attitude towards record companies. "Despair in the Departure Lounge" doesn't help since it's much like the song "Riot Van", which was the weakest track on their last album. "No Buses" is much the same, keeping it light and kind of uninvolved. The saving grace here is the title track, "Who the F**ck Are Arctic Monkeys?", which is a pretty good song. Still, it does not measure up to the album, which might create doubts in fans. After listening to this, I found myself wondering if they were just lazy making this EP, or if they really aren't actually that good. Maybe they just got lucky with the album. I don't like that idea either, but this isn't the high quality that we've come to expect. For most bands, this would be just fine. Not for the Arctic Monkeys, who have proven themselves to be head and shoulders among others. Is it worth a listen? Yeah, you might like it. It just doesn't have the charm and wit that made the band's music so good on the album.

I like em, but...

...those who do not like them have good points. They really don't innovate that much, but rather they infuse slightly witty lyrics into the non-innovation that is their guitar themes. They aren't the best band ever. They never will be. Stop saying it please. I liked these guys too when they were really really really indie, and I won't stop because they are popular, but saying they are the best band ever is really something that would never leave my mouth.

Biography

Formed: 2003 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '00s, '10s

By distilling the sounds of Franz Ferdinand, the Clash, the Strokes, and the Libertines into a hybrid of swaggering indie rock and danceable neo-punk, Arctic Monkeys became one of the U.K.'s biggest bands of the new millennium. Their meteoric rise began in 2005, when the teenagers fielded offers from major labels and drew a sold-out crowd to the London Astoria, using little more than a self-released EP as bait. Several months later, Whatever People Say I Am, That's What...
Full Bio