13 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

No less caffeinated than they’ve ever been, these Philadelphia punk-pop heroes get existential on their fifth album. Ruminations on death are everywhere here—whether they're internalizing pop-cultural lore on “A Song for Patsy Cline” and “A Song for Ernest Hemingway,” or envisioning a different life narrative for a friend who died on “Thanks for the Ride.” But no matter the subject, singer Dan “Soupy” Campbell still strains his vocals with every heartfelt word he screams—and each song burns with huge choruses, thundering drums, and guitars cranked to 11.

EDITORS’ NOTES

No less caffeinated than they’ve ever been, these Philadelphia punk-pop heroes get existential on their fifth album. Ruminations on death are everywhere here—whether they're internalizing pop-cultural lore on “A Song for Patsy Cline” and “A Song for Ernest Hemingway,” or envisioning a different life narrative for a friend who died on “Thanks for the Ride.” But no matter the subject, singer Dan “Soupy” Campbell still strains his vocals with every heartfelt word he screams—and each song burns with huge choruses, thundering drums, and guitars cranked to 11.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
168 Ratings
168 Ratings
Jppeace1 ,

So good, so many feels

This album has made me cry maybe 10 times and it isn't even actually released yet

Colton musselman ,

The Wonder Years do it again.

although the trilogy is over, this record has fulfilled everything that I never knew I needed. from the debut single, "Cardinals" all the way until the title track, "No Closer To Heaven." the wonder years have solidified their sound into my heart and their way on to fame.

Babbajskajsajajbsbsjskdkd ,

amazing

the wonder years continue to amaze me, i love them and their music, cant wait to enter this era as a fan!

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