10 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released more than two years after its last studio album, No One Can Ever Know finds the Scottish indie rock band bypassing its usual wall of sound for a sparser attack, influenced by bands such as Can, Cabaret Voltaire, Public Image Ltd., and Liars. Had Joy Division been Scottish, it might have sounded a bit like The Twilight Sad here. It's a mix of Unknown Pleasures and Closer brought to a cathartic head. On "Dead City," analog synths meet an anonymous ethereal ambience to set the stage for James Graham's existential yet committed vocals. "Sick" suggests a Scottish folk song being transported to Manchester for the post-punk explosion. "Don't Move" uses guitars to strike while the iron is hot. "Don't Look at Me" warms up the sound with more generous backing vocals providing emotional support. Producer Andrew Weatherall gives the band the proper space and a full sonic spectrum to make this a positive step in its creative direction.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released more than two years after its last studio album, No One Can Ever Know finds the Scottish indie rock band bypassing its usual wall of sound for a sparser attack, influenced by bands such as Can, Cabaret Voltaire, Public Image Ltd., and Liars. Had Joy Division been Scottish, it might have sounded a bit like The Twilight Sad here. It's a mix of Unknown Pleasures and Closer brought to a cathartic head. On "Dead City," analog synths meet an anonymous ethereal ambience to set the stage for James Graham's existential yet committed vocals. "Sick" suggests a Scottish folk song being transported to Manchester for the post-punk explosion. "Don't Move" uses guitars to strike while the iron is hot. "Don't Look at Me" warms up the sound with more generous backing vocals providing emotional support. Producer Andrew Weatherall gives the band the proper space and a full sonic spectrum to make this a positive step in its creative direction.

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