3 Songs, 10 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you’re new to the early British punk band the Slits, this is probably not the place to start — not because the songs aren’t worth having, but rather because this is the band regrouped, 27 years after they made their indelible mark in the punk history books. Although this version features founding members Ari Up on vocals and Tessa Pollitt on bass, the original off-beat, reggae/dub-tinged rants of the Slits are not easily matched, and the patina of time (not age; these women still rock) has somewhat softened the hard edges, perhaps lending a gentler veneer to Up’s vocals. Drummer Paul Cook of the Sex Pistols is here, along with guitarist Marco Pirroni of the Banshees and Adam & the Ants, which probably explains why this version of “Number One Enemy” sounds more Pistols-ish and less Slits-like. “Kill Them With Love” is fittingly titled, as the softer, gentler version of the Slits lull the listener into what might be a false comfort zone. The best moment here is the dubby “Slits Tradition,” full of echoey, rumbling bass and sense of dread beneath the semi-sweet vocals.

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you’re new to the early British punk band the Slits, this is probably not the place to start — not because the songs aren’t worth having, but rather because this is the band regrouped, 27 years after they made their indelible mark in the punk history books. Although this version features founding members Ari Up on vocals and Tessa Pollitt on bass, the original off-beat, reggae/dub-tinged rants of the Slits are not easily matched, and the patina of time (not age; these women still rock) has somewhat softened the hard edges, perhaps lending a gentler veneer to Up’s vocals. Drummer Paul Cook of the Sex Pistols is here, along with guitarist Marco Pirroni of the Banshees and Adam & the Ants, which probably explains why this version of “Number One Enemy” sounds more Pistols-ish and less Slits-like. “Kill Them With Love” is fittingly titled, as the softer, gentler version of the Slits lull the listener into what might be a false comfort zone. The best moment here is the dubby “Slits Tradition,” full of echoey, rumbling bass and sense of dread beneath the semi-sweet vocals.

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