Odd Soul (Deluxe Version) by MUTEMATH on Apple Music

16 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

A tension of opposites runs through MuteMath’s third album, Odd Soul. Serene vocals float above churning grooves while spiky guitar riffs stab at candyfloss melodies. The album’s musical complexity is reflected in multilayered lyrics, many of which touch on the band’s Christian roots. In the process, MuteMath achieves an unlikely fusion of ‘70s funk, ‘80s new wave, and classic prog-rock that propels its sound into challenging experimental territory. Drummer Darren King plays a particularly crucial role here, laying down ferocious, cymbal-bashing percussion on “Quarantine,” “Allies,” and similar tunes. Paul Meany’s lead vocals weave around the quivering keyboards and molten bass, rising to an effortless falsetto that conveys hipster cool with a hint of prophetic vision. The jittery boogie beat of “Blood Pressure” helps deliver a message against narrow-minded believers. Odd Soul ends with the luminous “In No Time,” a quietly passionate reaffirmation of faith that reconciles the jarring elements in this intoxicating album.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A tension of opposites runs through MuteMath’s third album, Odd Soul. Serene vocals float above churning grooves while spiky guitar riffs stab at candyfloss melodies. The album’s musical complexity is reflected in multilayered lyrics, many of which touch on the band’s Christian roots. In the process, MuteMath achieves an unlikely fusion of ‘70s funk, ‘80s new wave, and classic prog-rock that propels its sound into challenging experimental territory. Drummer Darren King plays a particularly crucial role here, laying down ferocious, cymbal-bashing percussion on “Quarantine,” “Allies,” and similar tunes. Paul Meany’s lead vocals weave around the quivering keyboards and molten bass, rising to an effortless falsetto that conveys hipster cool with a hint of prophetic vision. The jittery boogie beat of “Blood Pressure” helps deliver a message against narrow-minded believers. Odd Soul ends with the luminous “In No Time,” a quietly passionate reaffirmation of faith that reconciles the jarring elements in this intoxicating album.

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3:15
4:12
3:03
2:55
4:50
1:51
3:14
3:28
3:04
5:03
3:29
7:03
4:52
2:37
3:42
2:53

About MUTEMATH

Taking cues from several decades of alternative rock, MUTEMATH (also known as Mute Math and MuteMath) fuse together New Order's synth-dance epics, the Stone Roses' shambling shuffle, Radiohead's chilliness, Air's ambient pop, and the booming vocals of mainstream pop/rock. Singer Paul Meany, formerly of the Christian rock group Earthsuit, was working in New Orleans when he began a long-distance musical correspondence with drummer/programmer Darren King, who was based in Springfield, Missouri. The two began sending CD-Rs back and forth up the Mississippi River, eventually putting enough songs together to convince King to relocate to New Orleans and start a proper band. After adding guitarist Greg Hill and bassist Roy Mitchell-Cardenas, the new band completed the Meany-King compositions in 2003; Meany then took the resulting demo to noted CCM producer Tedd T., who was enthusiastic enough to launch a new indie label, Teleprompt Records, in order to release 2004's Reset EP. The EP's success allowed MUTEMATH and Teleprompt to negotiate a distribution deal with Warner Bros., which reissued the EP in 2005.

Although MUTEMATH completed their self-titled debut album that same year, marketing disputes between Teleprompt and Warner Bros. delayed its release for nearly a year. MUTEMATH and Teleprompt filed suit against the major label, claiming breach of contract and negligent misrepresentation. The band's website announced that the suit was settled out of court, concurrent with the signing of an improved deal with Warner Bros. An expanded version of MUTEMATH, featuring remastered tracks from Reset and a bonus limited-edition live EP, was released on September 26, 2006.

"Typical" proved to be a modestly successful single, cracking the mainstream rock charts in 2007 and finding a home on MTV, where the song's Grammy-nominated video became a hit. Tours with Eisley, Alanis Morissette, and Matchbox Twenty honed the band's live chops, and MUTEMATH returned in 2009 with a new album, Armistice. The album debuted at number 18, and MUTEMATH toured heavily in support, capturing one of their live shows on the 2010 concert album Armistice Live. Todd Gummerman replaced guitarist Greg Hill that October, and the follow-up studio album, Odd Soul, was released in 2011. Vitals, the band's fourth studio long-player, was issued in 2015 via the band's own label, Wojtek Records, and featured the singles "Monument" and "Used To." The following year saw the release of "Changes," a new MUTEMATH single that, along with several remixes from the Vitals sessions, was included on an album of the same name. Following the departure of longtime bassist Mitchell-Cardenas, the band announced the release of "Hit Parade," the lead single from their fifth LP, Play Dead. One month before the album's September 2017 release, founding drummer King also departed. ~ Stewart Mason

  • ORIGIN
    New Orleans, LA
  • FORMED
    2001

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