13 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bart Crow Band hails from Austin, Texas where you have to go out of your way to find bad barbeque and mediocre music. Their second album brews a hearty rue of solid country rock loaded with barbed song hooks, absorbing lyrics, timeless production, and a heap of rootsy instruments — the most noticeable being a gritty Hammond organ that grinds over twangy Telecasters on the opening “Driftin’ In the Wind,” a countrified power-pop gem contrasting up-tempo, smile inducing melodies with lovelorn lyrics. “Back Down” grooves with impressive guitar leads that walk a tightrope between dexterous finesse and drunken, sloppy, crunchy distortion to sound like a tougher version of the Gin Blossoms. The fetching “Hollywood” is a standout, an Americana ballad boasting heartbreaking male/female vocal harmonies (the latter provided by the silky voiced Fallon Franklin). Fans of early ‘90s alt-country bands will likely gravitate toward the title track, which evokes the era’s penchant for trying to find out what things might have sounded like if the Replacements grew up in Texas instead of Minnesota. Much here hinges on the ghost of alt-country past, but the ideas and lyrics here are hardly outdated.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bart Crow Band hails from Austin, Texas where you have to go out of your way to find bad barbeque and mediocre music. Their second album brews a hearty rue of solid country rock loaded with barbed song hooks, absorbing lyrics, timeless production, and a heap of rootsy instruments — the most noticeable being a gritty Hammond organ that grinds over twangy Telecasters on the opening “Driftin’ In the Wind,” a countrified power-pop gem contrasting up-tempo, smile inducing melodies with lovelorn lyrics. “Back Down” grooves with impressive guitar leads that walk a tightrope between dexterous finesse and drunken, sloppy, crunchy distortion to sound like a tougher version of the Gin Blossoms. The fetching “Hollywood” is a standout, an Americana ballad boasting heartbreaking male/female vocal harmonies (the latter provided by the silky voiced Fallon Franklin). Fans of early ‘90s alt-country bands will likely gravitate toward the title track, which evokes the era’s penchant for trying to find out what things might have sounded like if the Replacements grew up in Texas instead of Minnesota. Much here hinges on the ghost of alt-country past, but the ideas and lyrics here are hardly outdated.

TITLE TIME
3:48
3:17
3:48
4:06
3:43
5:16
3:49
4:02
3:44
3:13
4:14
3:48
4:00

About Bart Crow

Since debuting in 2005, roots rock singer/songwriter Bart Crow and his band have practically worn grooves in the Southern and Midwestern highways from years of non-stop touring. A native of Maypearl, Texas, Crow played a bit of guitar in high school, learning some country and classic rock tunes, but it wasn't until after a stint in the U.S. Army that his songwriting sensibilities began to take shape. Following a move to Austin, he put together the Bart Crow Band, whose independently released debut, Finally, became a surprise regional hit, selling thousands of copies. Over the next five years, he would release two more albums, log thousands of road miles, and notch four number one singles on the Texas charts, all without the assistance of a label. His blue collar mix of Texas country, hard-edged rock, soul, and blues would continue to win him fans the old-fashioned way: through tireless gigging, radio exposure, and dogged persistence. Following a 2011 live album, he released his fourth studio LP, Dandelion, which debuted at number one on Billboard's South Central Heatseekers chart. Having paid his dues for nearly a decade, Crow signed on with influential Nashville label/management firm Thirty Tigers, which released his fifth album, The Parade, in 2015. He topped off that banner year with his first appearance on the Grand Ole Opry as part of their 90th anniversary celebration. ~ Timothy Monger

  • ORIGIN
    Maypearl, TX

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