10 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The pedal steel signifies alt-country. The finger-picked acoustic guitars lean towards folk. The muted, unassuming, sometimes too-buried vocals suggest that murky sadcore space where Cat Power usually hangs her tunes. Once a Denver-based drummer (she played for a spell with Band of Horses) and now Seattle-based singer-songwriter, Sera Cahoone’s second album creates a spell that is thorough and at times overwhelming. The tunes are strong and lasting but often obscured by the mostly rustic instrumentation (banjo, violin, pedal steel). Cahoone lurks behind the tunes as much as commands them, and she specializes in a high lonesome area where things sound as if they might be going bad even when they have the possibility of looking up. The extra energy behind “Happy When I’m Gone” practically sounds like the dawning of a new day when put next to the gorgeous but downcast drear of “Tryin’” or the solemn near prayer-like album closer “Seven Hours Later.” It makes for an effective 3 a.m. album. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

The pedal steel signifies alt-country. The finger-picked acoustic guitars lean towards folk. The muted, unassuming, sometimes too-buried vocals suggest that murky sadcore space where Cat Power usually hangs her tunes. Once a Denver-based drummer (she played for a spell with Band of Horses) and now Seattle-based singer-songwriter, Sera Cahoone’s second album creates a spell that is thorough and at times overwhelming. The tunes are strong and lasting but often obscured by the mostly rustic instrumentation (banjo, violin, pedal steel). Cahoone lurks behind the tunes as much as commands them, and she specializes in a high lonesome area where things sound as if they might be going bad even when they have the possibility of looking up. The extra energy behind “Happy When I’m Gone” practically sounds like the dawning of a new day when put next to the gorgeous but downcast drear of “Tryin’” or the solemn near prayer-like album closer “Seven Hours Later.” It makes for an effective 3 a.m. album. 

TITLE TIME
3:12
4:09
3:56
3:24
3:56
5:40
3:36
3:09
3:20
4:15

About Sera Cahoone

In the vein of such inviting indie folk crooners as Iron & Wine, Laura Veirs, and the seemingly hundreds of folks attempting to be the next Elliott Smith without the unpleasant end, Sera Cahoone's self-described goal in her official press kit is to be seen as "a musical love child of Buck Owens and Cat Power." Raised in the suburbs of Denver, Colorado, Cahoone began playing drums at the age of 11 and spent her teenage years in a succession of local bands, often in the company of Roger Green (later of the Czars) and future fellow indie folk singer/songwriter Patrick Park. Landing in the Pacific Northwest upon leaving school, Cahoone joined the artsy indie rock outfit Carissa's Wierd, despite their egregiously misspelled name. The group developed a cult following over the course of several increasingly baroque and accomplished records, but split up in 2003 when leader Jenn Ghetto left to concentrate on her solo project S. While occasionally playing drums with another Carissa's Wierd offshoot, Band of Horses, Cahoone wrote and recorded her self-titled solo debut in 2005. Originally self-released but eventually distributed by Sub Pop Records, Sera Cahoone garnered quite a bit of critical acclaim and paved the way for 2008's follow-up record, Only as the Day Is Long, released on Sub Pop. The album led to positive reviews and her second Sub Pop collection, Deer Creek Canyon. For 2017's From Where I Started, Cahoone moved from Sub Pop to Lady Muleskinner Records. ~ Stewart Mason

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