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Project 1950

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Album Review

Project 1950 is technically a Misfits album, but it's more like Frankenstein's monster, a cobbled-together project given life by the kinetic, funbox electricity emitted by a bunch of guys chopping out punkified covers of favorite oldies. Led by the amateurish yet somehow delightful warble of Jerry Only, who sounds like Brad Garrett of Everybody Loves Raymond if the glowering actor were to sing, this reincarnated Misfits lineup also includes drummer Marky Ramone and ex-Black Flag guitarist Dez Cadena. Since each veteran provided Project 1950 with believable liner notes professing his love of the vintage material, it's good to hear their excitement in the recordings, which crackle with enthusiasm. Produced by John Cafiero with attention to maximum thickness, "This Magic Moment" explodes out of the box with a flourish of guitar and pounding drums, only to hit another gear with the addition of supporting vocalist Ronnie Spector — yes, Ronnie Spector. The erstwhile Ronette sounds like an angel with a dirty mind backing up the devil-lock'd Only; together with Ramone and Cadena's thudding instrumentation, their version is like the soundtrack to a greasers-only formal. Though Spector doesn't return until the album's closing number, Only and his henchmen continue on through a boisterous "Dream Lover" (complete with background "oohs," "aaahs," and "yeah yeahs") and an overdriven "Donna" that's the most punk-leaning of 1950's material. The album flags a bit by its middle — "Great Balls of Fire" and "Latest Flame" seem to pile on top of one another, as if Only's Fred stopped short and Ramone and Cadena came crashing in behind him like Scooby and Shaggy. But the guys crank it up again for an obligatory tear through "Monster Mash," and "Runaway" isn't half bad, either. Project 1950 isn't really the Misfits. For one thing, it's about as scary as a bunch of cartoon ghouls driving around in a goosed-up Munsters funny car. But the album is really enjoyable in a nostalgia sort of way — it's most interesting for being nostalgic both for rock & roll's birth and its punk rock adolescence. [Note: The CD arrives with a bonus disc featuring live material and music videos.]

Customer Reviews

Great stuff

Only takes a twist on jukebox classics with punk-themed covers. Very different but with his voice it works. Love it!

Goodstuff

This is a fun cd! Sounds nothing like earlier misfits stuff but if u accept it for what it is, it's pretty great.

Nothing to write home about.

Jerry Only has been very busy of late, looks like he has gone through iTunes and removed nearly all of the negative reviews from his retched solo project. Thats right kids, there is no Misfits, just Jerry and a lot of computer equipment to make him sound nearly human. This music is not just bad, its down right lazy. Without Graves to write the music and Chud to bring it all together, Jerry decided to release an album of covers instead of trying to write new material. If you think Jerry is paying homage to those that came before him, think again. Joey Ramone spoke extensively of his love for 50's rock music and how he felt they laid the ground work for the Ramones and other punk bands. Jerry just took what Joey said and has done his best to profit off another musician ideas. Burn in hell Jerry.

Biography

Formed: 1977 in Lodi, NJ

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Genuinely shocking or tasteless, campy fun? It was sometimes hard to tell which way the Misfits wanted to be taken, and the immense cult following that has grown up in the years after their actual existence (1977-1983) seems divided in its own assessment. It certainly wasn't the Misfits' musicianship — which was as crude as the recording quality of most of their oeuvre — that endeared them to so many, although Glenn Danzig possessed one of the most distinctive and tuneful bellows in hardcore...
Full Bio