10 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Music fans and critics alike treated 1988’s Ooh Yeah! like a “comeback” bid. The duo’s previous studio album, Big Bam Boom, had been released just shy of four years earlier. However, Daryl Hall’s second solo album (1986's mystifying 3 Hearts in the Happy Ending Machine) had perhaps given the impression that the duo were finished. This album's “Everything Your Heart Desires” reached No. 3 in the Top 40, proving that Hall & Oates still had what it took to land a knockout punch. The album was treated as lackluster, despite featuring the Hall & Oates joint composition “Realove,” the Hall and Holly Knight track “Soul Love,” the Hall and Janna Allen song “I’m in Pieces," and Oates’ “Keep on Pushin’ Love”—all songs that would’ve made Big Bam Boom a stronger album. Timing and public image are everything in the pop world, and likely the unconvincing excitement of the album title Ooh Yeah! made potential fans wonder if that lack of inspiration followed between the album covers. It didn’t, but the damage was done.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Music fans and critics alike treated 1988’s Ooh Yeah! like a “comeback” bid. The duo’s previous studio album, Big Bam Boom, had been released just shy of four years earlier. However, Daryl Hall’s second solo album (1986's mystifying 3 Hearts in the Happy Ending Machine) had perhaps given the impression that the duo were finished. This album's “Everything Your Heart Desires” reached No. 3 in the Top 40, proving that Hall & Oates still had what it took to land a knockout punch. The album was treated as lackluster, despite featuring the Hall & Oates joint composition “Realove,” the Hall and Holly Knight track “Soul Love,” the Hall and Janna Allen song “I’m in Pieces," and Oates’ “Keep on Pushin’ Love”—all songs that would’ve made Big Bam Boom a stronger album. Timing and public image are everything in the pop world, and likely the unconvincing excitement of the album title Ooh Yeah! made potential fans wonder if that lack of inspiration followed between the album covers. It didn’t, but the damage was done.

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