12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since the early ‘90s, Caedmon’s Call has served up their unpretentious brand of Christian folk-rock with remarkable consistency. Overdressed (2007) ranks among their most appealing releases, emphasizing the acoustic-oriented sound which earned them their original following. This album marks the return of founding singer/guitarist Derek Webb to the fold, and evidently he and songwriting spouse Sandra McCracken have been listening to the Band in their spare time — “Trouble” and “Share In The Blame” recall the melodic rock/country/gospel fusion of that legendary group. There’s an early ‘70s vibe to many tracks, with tunes like “Need Your Love” and “There Is A Reason” bringing bands like Poco and Pure Prairie League to mind. As ever, the group’s warmly-strummed guitars and brisk drumlines are harnessed to convey a God-centered message. This doesn’t preclude critiques of fellow believers — “Expectations” (sung by Andrew Osenga) takes a swipe at commercialized Christianity. For her part, Danielle Young considers God’s constant presence in “Sacred” and celebrates family life in “Love Grows Love.” A wider view is provided by “Two Weeks In Africa,” a Third World travel narrative. Tuneful, intelligent, and “spirited,” in more than one sense of the word.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since the early ‘90s, Caedmon’s Call has served up their unpretentious brand of Christian folk-rock with remarkable consistency. Overdressed (2007) ranks among their most appealing releases, emphasizing the acoustic-oriented sound which earned them their original following. This album marks the return of founding singer/guitarist Derek Webb to the fold, and evidently he and songwriting spouse Sandra McCracken have been listening to the Band in their spare time — “Trouble” and “Share In The Blame” recall the melodic rock/country/gospel fusion of that legendary group. There’s an early ‘70s vibe to many tracks, with tunes like “Need Your Love” and “There Is A Reason” bringing bands like Poco and Pure Prairie League to mind. As ever, the group’s warmly-strummed guitars and brisk drumlines are harnessed to convey a God-centered message. This doesn’t preclude critiques of fellow believers — “Expectations” (sung by Andrew Osenga) takes a swipe at commercialized Christianity. For her part, Danielle Young considers God’s constant presence in “Sacred” and celebrates family life in “Love Grows Love.” A wider view is provided by “Two Weeks In Africa,” a Third World travel narrative. Tuneful, intelligent, and “spirited,” in more than one sense of the word.

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