Pacific Dust by The Mother Hips on Apple Music

12 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

San Francisco’s Mother Hips were once favorites of producer Rick Rubin — who signed them to his American Records label — but these days the group records for an independent label and sings its tales of musical trials to a devoted cult who hear great things from leader Tim Bluhm. Their seventh studio release, Pacific Dust centers on the music. The band’s alt-country attack is highlighted by thorny electric guitars that consistently break through the laidback lope (“White Falcon Fuzz”) or add to the funkier attack (the record company politics of “Third Floor Story”). Tremoloed guitars ramp up the attack for “Jess OXOX.” “The Lion and the Bull” shades towards Jayhawks territory with its sweet, pining harmonies. “One Way Out” lays back further towards the Eagles’ Southern California harmonies and West Coast groove. “All In Favor” heads for Hawaii. The title track flows towards the psychedelic end of the band’s influences. “Young Charles Ives” shadows early Bowie. The Mother Hips, nearly twenty years on, continue to journey through the past to find the present.

EDITORS’ NOTES

San Francisco’s Mother Hips were once favorites of producer Rick Rubin — who signed them to his American Records label — but these days the group records for an independent label and sings its tales of musical trials to a devoted cult who hear great things from leader Tim Bluhm. Their seventh studio release, Pacific Dust centers on the music. The band’s alt-country attack is highlighted by thorny electric guitars that consistently break through the laidback lope (“White Falcon Fuzz”) or add to the funkier attack (the record company politics of “Third Floor Story”). Tremoloed guitars ramp up the attack for “Jess OXOX.” “The Lion and the Bull” shades towards Jayhawks territory with its sweet, pining harmonies. “One Way Out” lays back further towards the Eagles’ Southern California harmonies and West Coast groove. “All In Favor” heads for Hawaii. The title track flows towards the psychedelic end of the band’s influences. “Young Charles Ives” shadows early Bowie. The Mother Hips, nearly twenty years on, continue to journey through the past to find the present.

TITLE TIME
4:17
4:02
3:36
3:07
3:34
4:09
6:06
4:40
3:27
3:33
7:37
4:49

About The Mother Hips

Formed in Chico, CA, in 1991, earthy pop jam rockers the Mother Hips moved up from bar band status through a series of regional tours and built a sizable fan base in California. Songwriter, vocalist, and guitarist Tim Bluhm, guitarist Greg Loiacono, bassist Isaac Parsons, and drummer Mike Wofchuck met in the dorms of Chico State in the early '90s. Loiacono and Bluhm's harmonies and country-tinged melodies honored California's musical past -- from Merle Haggard to the Beach Boys to Neil Young. Their 1992 album, entitled Back to the Grotto, caught the ear of American Recordings, which released 1995's Part-Timer Goes Full and 1996's Shootout. This relationship led to high-profile slots on tours with Johnny Cash, Wilco, and the H.O.R.D.E. tour. Drummer Wofchuck was replaced by John Hofer for 1998's country-rock Later Days. Three years later, the band released the more pop-oriented Green Hills of Earth. As soon as the album gained notoriety, singer/guitarist Greg Loiacono decided to take a break from the group, leaving the band's status in question. In 2005, Bluhm, Loiacono, Hofer, and new bassist Paul Hoaglin resumed playing music and released the Red Tandy EP on Camera Recordsin 2006 and followed it up with the full-length Kiss the Crystal Flake in early 2007. ~ Zac Johnson

  • ORIGIN
    Chico, CA
  • FORMED
    1991

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