12 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The tenth album from fearless kitchen-sink experimentalists Animal Collective builds on a sound the band first explored on 2012’s Centipede Hz: bouncy, busy, colorful psych-pop for a post-guitar generation. Opening with the most immediate song they’ve ever recorded (“FloriDada”), Painting With strips away the meandering naturalism of Sung Tongs and the cavernous ambience of Merriweather Post Pavilion for a carbonated, synth-heavy sound conjuring '50s sci-fi soundtracks (“Hocus Pocus”), '80s video-game music (“The Burglars”), and something from just beyond tomorrow (“Lying in the Grass”). It’s an album that retains the band’s idiosyncratic sweetness while managing to be unusually direct.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The tenth album from fearless kitchen-sink experimentalists Animal Collective builds on a sound the band first explored on 2012’s Centipede Hz: bouncy, busy, colorful psych-pop for a post-guitar generation. Opening with the most immediate song they’ve ever recorded (“FloriDada”), Painting With strips away the meandering naturalism of Sung Tongs and the cavernous ambience of Merriweather Post Pavilion for a carbonated, synth-heavy sound conjuring '50s sci-fi soundtracks (“Hocus Pocus”), '80s video-game music (“The Burglars”), and something from just beyond tomorrow (“Lying in the Grass”). It’s an album that retains the band’s idiosyncratic sweetness while managing to be unusually direct.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
108 Ratings
108 Ratings
Shibby_Dude :D

Pretty Disappointing

Just finished a whole listen through and I can't say I'm thrilled. The two songs they released before the album, "Floridada" and "Lying in the Grass" we're pretty awesome and had me hyped up. But it seemed that they knew which two to pick considering the rest of the album was a bit boring. The songs just kinda moped around and overstayed their welcome. While there were some neat parts to the album, they were overshadowed by a lot of uninteresting, weird electronics. The vocal melodies, also, were not as plentiful as I had envisioned them to be. I'll give it another go later, maybe it'll grow on me. But yeah.. I'm very let down with this right now.

MeisChristian

5/5 mastapeece

if you are wondering if this will be a good album.... it will be. just dont buy it from here. go to domino records and buy the album cover you want. choose between Avey, Panda, or Geo.

RWatson

Reviewed AFTER It Was Released

As disorienting as their earlier work, but focusing the “psychedelia” on the seesaw-ing vocals instead of the composition or texture of previous works. Starting to climb out of the Centipede Hz feel into something more tropical, but still haven't left that same crunchy, everything-to-the-front, thick groove-heavy feel of the last album.
I feel like a lot of their effort was focused on the technique, especially vocals, and production. These are pop-y songs with the Animal Collective bent towards experimentation, I feel, rather than predictably Animal Collective compositions. Every song has a quick tempo, with little respite in the album, which I feel was the main criticism with Centipede Hz: There was nowhere for the listener to take refuge in some chanting rhythm with samples of cats meowing, which is part of what I think of when I happily think of Animal Collective.

In short, this album has just as much experimentation as any Animal Collective album, and they always get high marks for ingenuity. I myself would have prefered a little variety in the tracks, as it feels like it never really lets any of the album “land.”

About Animal Collective

Animal Collective were formed in Baltimore County, Maryland, by longtime friends and musical collaborators Avey Tare (David Portner), Panda Bear (Noah Lennox), Deakin (Josh Dibb), and Geologist (Brian Weitz). With a penchant for genre-hopping and studio experimentation, the group began drawing comparisons to everyone from the Residents and the Flaming Lips to the Incredible String Band and the Holy Modal Rounders. Solo and side projects proved to be a continual occupation for most of the group's members, particularly Panda Bear (Young Prayer, Person Pitch) and Avey Tare (Pullhair Rubeye, Avey Tare's Slasher Flicks), but Animal Collective proved to be the most successful of all the musicians' ventures.

The Collective released their debut album, Spirit They're Gone, Spirit They've Vanished (originally titled Avey Tare and Panda Bear) in 2000 on the band's own Animal imprint. It was the first in a pair of captivating releases; the other was 2001's Danse Manatee (originally titled Avey Tare, Panda Bear and Geologist), which explored the fringes and intersecting boundaries of freak folk, noise rock, ambient drone, and twisting, melodic psychedelia. The live album Hollinndagain, which documented the band's debut tour alongside Black Dice, arrived in 2002, followed by 2003's Campfire Songs and Here Comes the Indian, the first albums to commit to the name Animal Collective and the first to feature all four members. The latter record was released on the group's newly minted Paw Tracks label.

As the Collective's popularity grew, so did their reach, resulting in a distribution deal with English independent label Fat Cat, which issued their first two albums as a package deal and paved the way for subsequent releases. The band returned in May 2004 with the triumphant Sung Tongs, a mysterious, fragilely melodic album that garnered positive press both at home and overseas, resulting in a series of successful international tours. The Prospect Hummer EP, which featured a collaboration with underground British folk legend Vashti Bunyan, arrived in early 2005, followed by the commercially and critically acclaimed full-length Feels later in the year. The band released the People EP in 2006, followed by the much heralded full-length Strawberry Jam in 2007, the band's first for Domino Records.

Merriweather Post Pavilion, the group's eighth and most accessible record to date, was released in 2009. It cracked the Top 20 in America and peaked at number 26 in the U.K., making Animal Collective the toast of the international blogosphere while also establishing their strength as a commercial force. Touring kept them busy for much of the year, but they did find some time to return to the studio and finish a short EP, Fall Be Kind, which appeared in November. In 2010, the group expanded its experimental sound into the visual realm with ODDSAC, a "visual album" that featured new material as the psychedelic soundtrack to a film starring the members of Animal Collective and directed by Danny Perez. Their next proper full-length, Centipede Hz, followed in 2012 along with an EP of remixes from the album entitled Monkey Been to Burntown in 2013. Side projects, DJ sets, and family occupied members until they reconvened in the spring of 2015 to work on new material. Eschewing reverb, ambience, and long developments, and calling it "our Ramones record" in a Rolling Stone interview, 2016's Painting With featured appearances by John Cale and saxophonist Colin Stetson. ~ James Christopher Monger

ORIGIN
Baltimore, MD
FORMED
1999

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