7 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With seven tracks, the 2011 EP Passed Me By from Manchester’s Andy Stott plays more like a mini-album. The intro, “Signature,” starts with the murkiest of beats and a scratchy ambience sounding like an underwater performance. Dubbed “death disco” in the U.K. and “witch house” on the West Coast, Stott’s aptly titled “New Ground” taps into the slowed pulse of dirge-heavy techno. Pitched-down beats drowning in reverb gurgle as a lonely female voice mournfully sings over the pitted textures and crumbling static of a war-ravaged soundscape. It’s only toward the song’s end that a skittering hi-hat offers hope of new life. “North to South” moves on a cloudy beat as suffocating synthesizers gasp for air and warbling chimes resonate in the distance like cracked bells. With sinister chanting looped over a funeral procession of exhausted beats, “Execution” is the darkest track of the lot. But even as Stott keeps these rhythms and textures trapped under ice, each composition offers a glimmer of life and a prospect for growth, akin to a flower blooming from decay.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With seven tracks, the 2011 EP Passed Me By from Manchester’s Andy Stott plays more like a mini-album. The intro, “Signature,” starts with the murkiest of beats and a scratchy ambience sounding like an underwater performance. Dubbed “death disco” in the U.K. and “witch house” on the West Coast, Stott’s aptly titled “New Ground” taps into the slowed pulse of dirge-heavy techno. Pitched-down beats drowning in reverb gurgle as a lonely female voice mournfully sings over the pitted textures and crumbling static of a war-ravaged soundscape. It’s only toward the song’s end that a skittering hi-hat offers hope of new life. “North to South” moves on a cloudy beat as suffocating synthesizers gasp for air and warbling chimes resonate in the distance like cracked bells. With sinister chanting looped over a funeral procession of exhausted beats, “Execution” is the darkest track of the lot. But even as Stott keeps these rhythms and textures trapped under ice, each composition offers a glimmer of life and a prospect for growth, akin to a flower blooming from decay.

TITLE TIME
0:37
6:21
4:50
3:26
6:04
5:15
6:53

About Andy Stott

During the latter part of the 2000s, Manchester-based DJ/producer Andy Stott evolved from making high-quality dub techno to releasing a singular and more adventurous strain with an approach that favored leaden tempos and unsettling, sample-based textures. Beginning in 2005, Stott recorded exclusively for his hometown's Modern Love label, where he quickly became a key member of the roster alongside fellow travelers Claro Intelecto and Demdike Stare. He released numerous singles and EPs, along with a taut 2006 album (Merciless) and a 2008 compilation (Unknown Exception). The producer made a significant creative advance in 2011 with a pair of creep-outs, Passed Me By and We Stay Together, that were combined and expanded for CD release by the end of the year. In 2012, he released his third proper album, Luxury Problems, which incorporated vocals from Alison Skidmore, his former piano teacher. Skidmore was present once more on Faith in Strangers, a 2014 album that featured some of Stott's least and most abrasive material. For 2016's Too Many Voices, which tempered abrasive drums with glassy keyboard melodies, Stott cited grime mixtapes and David Sylvian and Ryuichi Sakamoto's 1982 avant-pop 12" collaboration as inspirations. Additionally, Stott has produced some exceptional breakbeat-oriented dubstep and drum'n'bass as Andrea; beside Demdike Stare's Miles Whittaker, he has recorded as Millie & Andrea. Those two, along with Gary Howell, also produced drum'n'bass as Hate. As a remix producer Stott's most noteworthy commissions include Vladislav Delay's "Recovery Idea," Blondes' "Pleasure," Tricky's "Valentine," and Martin Gore's "Europa Hymn." ~ Andy Kellman

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