10 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A sensational early dancehall album featuring production from the great Winston Riley, One, Two is notable for containing “Bam Bam”: a nimble, effortlessly catchy riff on the deathless Stalag rhythm and one of the most popular dancehall songs of all time. Nancy borrowed the refrain of "Bam Bam" from Yellowman but added original verses that transformed the song into a powerful statement on feminism, ambition, and the Jamaican music scene. It'd be a shame, however, to remember Sister Nancy for only this song. She was a profoundly gifted DJ who'd honed her technique for years under the tutelage of her older brother, Brigadier Jerry. Her relaxed, sing-song style does recall her brother’s at times, particularly on “Ain’t No Stopping Nancy." But Nancy’s work is distinguished by her sly humor, wordplay, and fondness for extended storytelling, as on “Transport Connection," where she paints a vivid picture of the difficulties of international touring while simultaneously riffing on Nicodemus’ hit “Boneman Connection."

EDITORS’ NOTES

A sensational early dancehall album featuring production from the great Winston Riley, One, Two is notable for containing “Bam Bam”: a nimble, effortlessly catchy riff on the deathless Stalag rhythm and one of the most popular dancehall songs of all time. Nancy borrowed the refrain of "Bam Bam" from Yellowman but added original verses that transformed the song into a powerful statement on feminism, ambition, and the Jamaican music scene. It'd be a shame, however, to remember Sister Nancy for only this song. She was a profoundly gifted DJ who'd honed her technique for years under the tutelage of her older brother, Brigadier Jerry. Her relaxed, sing-song style does recall her brother’s at times, particularly on “Ain’t No Stopping Nancy." But Nancy’s work is distinguished by her sly humor, wordplay, and fondness for extended storytelling, as on “Transport Connection," where she paints a vivid picture of the difficulties of international touring while simultaneously riffing on Nicodemus’ hit “Boneman Connection."

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3:36
2:56
3:19
3:19
3:54
3:16
3:45
3:26
3:15
3:29

About Sister Nancy

b. Nancy Russell, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. Sister Nancy was one of 15 siblings; her brother Robert, known to her family as Dickie, found fame as Brigadier Jerry. The latter began chanting on Prince Norman’s sound system before settling with Jahlove Music. While the Brigadier’s reputation as the number one cultural DJ flourished, by her mid-teens, Nancy was occasionally performing on the sound system. Winston Riley was the first producer to take Nancy into the recording studio in 1980 for her debut, ‘Papa Dean’. The tune was a success and Nancy’s career began in earnest. She performed at Reggae Sunsplash, which was transmitted globally. A notable appearance on A Dee Jay Explosion saw Nancy performing ‘Chalice A Fe Burn’ and ‘Boom Shacka Lacka’. With Winston Riley in 1982 her debut One Two was released, featuring the title track, ‘Aint No Stopping Nancy’, ‘Bam Bam’ and ‘Only Woman DJ With Degree’. She also recorded a classic rendition of ‘King And Queen’ with Yellowman. With producer Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes, she recorded ‘A No Any Man Can Test Sister Nancy’, ‘Bang Belly’ and another Yellowman combination, ‘Jah Mek Us Fe A Purpose’. She continued appearing live in the dancehall where she often performed alongside her brother on the Jahlove Music Sound System. The sound toured internationally to rave reviews, including a celebrated session at Brixton Town Hall, London, where both Jerry and Nancy made their debut performances in the UK.

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