13 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On Phoenix, The Classic Crime experiences a creative rebirth that lifts the Christian rock band to a higher level. Funded by a Kickstarter campaign and self-released, the album deserves praise for its literate lyrics, eclectic musical approach, and sense of artistic independence. The Classic Crime has come a long way from the earnest if relatively underdeveloped tunes on its 2006 debut, Albatross. Lead singer Matt MacDonald and his comrades have gained considerable depth of expression without losing the passion that characterized the band's early work. The accusatory tone of initial Classic Crime releases has been tempered by a new spiritual humility; tracks like “Heaven and Hell,” “Beautiful Darkness," and “Dead Rose” look inward as they portray the seductiveness of sin. The bracing rock waltz “Glass Houses” is especially self-implicating in its attack on hypocrisy and pride. A hunger for a closer relationship with God gives “The Precipice” and “Young Again” a palpable sense of yearning. Sonically, the tunes show melodic polish and richness, underscored by dynamic orchestral arrangements.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On Phoenix, The Classic Crime experiences a creative rebirth that lifts the Christian rock band to a higher level. Funded by a Kickstarter campaign and self-released, the album deserves praise for its literate lyrics, eclectic musical approach, and sense of artistic independence. The Classic Crime has come a long way from the earnest if relatively underdeveloped tunes on its 2006 debut, Albatross. Lead singer Matt MacDonald and his comrades have gained considerable depth of expression without losing the passion that characterized the band's early work. The accusatory tone of initial Classic Crime releases has been tempered by a new spiritual humility; tracks like “Heaven and Hell,” “Beautiful Darkness," and “Dead Rose” look inward as they portray the seductiveness of sin. The bracing rock waltz “Glass Houses” is especially self-implicating in its attack on hypocrisy and pride. A hunger for a closer relationship with God gives “The Precipice” and “Young Again” a palpable sense of yearning. Sonically, the tunes show melodic polish and richness, underscored by dynamic orchestral arrangements.

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