12 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Between the first and second albums by Faster Pussycat, hair metal became big business and the pressure to commercialize is felt in the band’s sophomore effort, Wake Me When It’s Over. “Poison Ivy,” “Gonna Walk” and “Pulling Weeds” are more sprightly and polished than the band’s early work, but generally they remain faithful to their strengths: rude ‘n’ rollicking bar rock. “Slip of the Tongue,” “Tattoo” and “Ain’t No Way Around It” are double-barrel metal riffs, but Faster Pussycat has a better sense of swing than any of their contemporaries (except Guns N’ Roses). Most of the album is downright danceable, which is more than anyone could say for the majority of ham-fisted hair metal acts. Of course, the song that made Wake Me When It’s Over a million-seller is “House of Pain,” a big, sappy, acoustic slow jam — all positive qualities if you’re talking about '80s power ballads. Taime Downe still squeals and screams with the best of them, and his band plays like they are on shore leave. While “House of Pain” won them a huge audience, “Where There’s a Whip There’s a Way,” with its fuel-injected riff and malicious intentions, is probably the best song the band ever recorded.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Between the first and second albums by Faster Pussycat, hair metal became big business and the pressure to commercialize is felt in the band’s sophomore effort, Wake Me When It’s Over. “Poison Ivy,” “Gonna Walk” and “Pulling Weeds” are more sprightly and polished than the band’s early work, but generally they remain faithful to their strengths: rude ‘n’ rollicking bar rock. “Slip of the Tongue,” “Tattoo” and “Ain’t No Way Around It” are double-barrel metal riffs, but Faster Pussycat has a better sense of swing than any of their contemporaries (except Guns N’ Roses). Most of the album is downright danceable, which is more than anyone could say for the majority of ham-fisted hair metal acts. Of course, the song that made Wake Me When It’s Over a million-seller is “House of Pain,” a big, sappy, acoustic slow jam — all positive qualities if you’re talking about '80s power ballads. Taime Downe still squeals and screams with the best of them, and his band plays like they are on shore leave. While “House of Pain” won them a huge audience, “Where There’s a Whip There’s a Way,” with its fuel-injected riff and malicious intentions, is probably the best song the band ever recorded.

TITLE TIME
6:43
5:07
4:25
5:46
4:13
4:35
4:30
4:52
4:52
4:31
4:25
6:20

About Faster Pussycat

Sleazy Hollywood metal band Faster Pussycat (whose name was lifted from a Russ Meyer flick) released their first album in 1987 and peaked commercially two years later with the gold album Wake Me When It's Over and the Top 40 single "House of Pain." Although their next album, 1992's Whipped, hit number 90 on the charts, it fell off quickly; with the alternative rock explosion, the hard rock audience had changed and had no patience for Faster Pussycat's trashy glam metal. After the group's split, singer Taime Downe formed the industrial-goth outfit the Newlydeads (along with a former member of another former L.A. glam pop outfit, Bang Tango's Kyle Kyle), issuing three albums -- 1997's self-titled debut, 1999's remix collection Re-Bound, and 2001's Dead End. With America experiencing a resurging interest in '80s glam pop by the early 21st century, Faster Pussycat reunited for a tour. But instead of an album of all new material coinciding with the tour, a collection of old tracks remade as techno remixes was issued, entitled Between the Valley of the Ultra Pussy (Downe was the only member of the band to have any input with the project). The band's first ever live release, Front Row for the Donkey Show, arrived in 2009. ~ John Book & Greg Prato

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