46 Songs, 2 Hours 25 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The incendiary dancehall kingpin Vybz Kartel boasts an unstoppable flow, an excess of badman charisma, and a penchant for boundary-pushing lyrics that's made him one of the most celebrated and controversial Jamaican artists of the ‘00s. Kartel began his career as a songwriter for the likes of Bounty Killer and The Scare Dem Crew, and no matter how outré his production choices or how risqué his lyrics, his songwriting never fails to impress. The sprawling Pon Di Gaza 2.0 is no exception. Its 46 songs greatly improve on 2009’s Pon Di Gaza, an electronic release that suffered from excessive censorship. Not so with Pon Di Gaza 2.0, which abounds in graphic tunes like “Bicycle” and “Come Breed Me" and tough-minded crime narratives like “Nuh Fraid a Nobody." For the most part, the production here is startlingly futuristic, draped in dissonant synthesizers and heavily Auto-Tuned vocals, but “Gaza Ting a Ling," a deliciously witty reworking of Shabba Ranks' “Ting a Ling,” is a surprising throwback and a welcome surprise for hardcore dancehall heads.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The incendiary dancehall kingpin Vybz Kartel boasts an unstoppable flow, an excess of badman charisma, and a penchant for boundary-pushing lyrics that's made him one of the most celebrated and controversial Jamaican artists of the ‘00s. Kartel began his career as a songwriter for the likes of Bounty Killer and The Scare Dem Crew, and no matter how outré his production choices or how risqué his lyrics, his songwriting never fails to impress. The sprawling Pon Di Gaza 2.0 is no exception. Its 46 songs greatly improve on 2009’s Pon Di Gaza, an electronic release that suffered from excessive censorship. Not so with Pon Di Gaza 2.0, which abounds in graphic tunes like “Bicycle” and “Come Breed Me" and tough-minded crime narratives like “Nuh Fraid a Nobody." For the most part, the production here is startlingly futuristic, draped in dissonant synthesizers and heavily Auto-Tuned vocals, but “Gaza Ting a Ling," a deliciously witty reworking of Shabba Ranks' “Ting a Ling,” is a surprising throwback and a welcome surprise for hardcore dancehall heads.

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