11 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In one of the most incredible, unforeseen twists in a career that is now approaching its sixth decade, Tom Jones has come out transformed as the gritty, bluesy, no-nonsense singer that he always had the potential to be. With a stripped-down approach, much like Johnny Cash’s American Recordings releases, Tom Jones shows us exactly why Van Morrison named Jones one of his favorite singers. Taking on the songs of Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and other classic blues numbers, Jones is a most convincing roadhouse singer, playing not to the bright lights of the arena but to the sweaty patrons at the bar. Dylan’s “What Good Am I?” remains a dark question. “Didn’t It Rain” turns into a joyous gospel shout. “If I Give My Soul” resounds as a slow, spiritual journey that could’ve been recorded years ago. “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” is the sound of a man recounting his life as he nears its completion (Jones just turned 70). One hopes this is just the beginning of a new phase in Jones’ amazing career.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In one of the most incredible, unforeseen twists in a career that is now approaching its sixth decade, Tom Jones has come out transformed as the gritty, bluesy, no-nonsense singer that he always had the potential to be. With a stripped-down approach, much like Johnny Cash’s American Recordings releases, Tom Jones shows us exactly why Van Morrison named Jones one of his favorite singers. Taking on the songs of Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and other classic blues numbers, Jones is a most convincing roadhouse singer, playing not to the bright lights of the arena but to the sweaty patrons at the bar. Dylan’s “What Good Am I?” remains a dark question. “Didn’t It Rain” turns into a joyous gospel shout. “If I Give My Soul” resounds as a slow, spiritual journey that could’ve been recorded years ago. “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” is the sound of a man recounting his life as he nears its completion (Jones just turned 70). One hopes this is just the beginning of a new phase in Jones’ amazing career.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
111 Ratings

111 Ratings

roger_floyd_gilmour ,

Tom Jones

I dont usually write reviews on here, but seeing that the first review for this album is just blatant lie, I had to say something. Anybody who questions the greatness of Sir Tom Jones deserves to beaten with a dead seal carcass. I quote Jones himself:

"We wanted to go back to basics, go back to the source, it was just me singing live with a rhythm section - no overdubbing, no gimmicks, no complicated horn and string arrangements, just get the song down in an entire take, capture the meaning of the song, its spirituality, its life, and capture that moment, right there. And I think that’s what we’ve done."

If the only Tom Jones you ever cared about was the one grabbed his junk in front of your face then sure you may be disappointed. You deserve to be disappointed with everything in your life since you yourself are obviously a disappointment. To all others who want a raw, beautiful and life-fulfilling album you will love this album more then your own children.

I do.

a grown up ,

Still Great

I gotta disagree with the first reviewer...obviously does not know what he's talking about...Tom's voice is stronger than ever on the disc, AND in person...saw him last year in concert when I took MY PARENTS to see him...WOW!, not only did my parents relive their youth, but I had the rare opportunity to see and listen to an artist who's voice is just as good in person as it is on a recording. How many of the 'contemporary' artists can you say that about???

Rev. Bill ,

Rockin the Gospel!

This strikes me as Tom's way of doing what Elvis might have done had he kicked the drugs & bad management, ditched Vegas & those awful movies and taken full charge of his work. It would have been great to hear him cut some of the strong rockin' blues & gospel he was raised on in a way that would have kept him relevant to any audience. (The whole 'Dread Zeppelin' concept may not haver been too far-fetched.) Too bad he didn't stick around long enough for the whole 'Americana' genre to happen.

This is not homogenized, processed music. This is a very interesting move from a classic blues belting singer who, at age 70, can still blow out the back wall of any room he sings in. For those longing for the Vegas version of Tom Jones, he's left it behind. So should you.

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