15 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Jezabels’ frontwoman, Hayley Mary, is a powerhouse vocalist; at her strongest moments, Kate Bush and Glasser’s Cameron Mesirow come to mind. There’s no bass, so the guitar and percussion dovetail into a solid rhythmic foundation, while ‘80s-flavored keyboards (think Simple Minds) billow on anthemic gusts of melancholy and melodrama. The slightly retro-leaning pop foursome from Sydney, Australia, has a way with startlingly catchy melodies and choruses, though The Jezabels’ artful, panoramic sound can also be beautifully evocative and haunting. The lead single, “Endless Summer,” begs for radio play with its stadium-sized guitar washes and Mary’s forceful intonation hinting at wistful balladry. It’s too energetic to be a ballad but has a similar emotional pull. “Rosebud” feels like one of those Cranberries or Sinead O’Connor songs that were once every rocker’s guilty pleasures. This collection (The Jezabels’ debut full-length) seeps into listeners’ musical id with little fanfare, as stealthy as dew settling on grass. Discovering the life force in The Jezabels’ deceptively modest sparkle is a delight.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Jezabels’ frontwoman, Hayley Mary, is a powerhouse vocalist; at her strongest moments, Kate Bush and Glasser’s Cameron Mesirow come to mind. There’s no bass, so the guitar and percussion dovetail into a solid rhythmic foundation, while ‘80s-flavored keyboards (think Simple Minds) billow on anthemic gusts of melancholy and melodrama. The slightly retro-leaning pop foursome from Sydney, Australia, has a way with startlingly catchy melodies and choruses, though The Jezabels’ artful, panoramic sound can also be beautifully evocative and haunting. The lead single, “Endless Summer,” begs for radio play with its stadium-sized guitar washes and Mary’s forceful intonation hinting at wistful balladry. It’s too energetic to be a ballad but has a similar emotional pull. “Rosebud” feels like one of those Cranberries or Sinead O’Connor songs that were once every rocker’s guilty pleasures. This collection (The Jezabels’ debut full-length) seeps into listeners’ musical id with little fanfare, as stealthy as dew settling on grass. Discovering the life force in The Jezabels’ deceptively modest sparkle is a delight.

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