13 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After its release, many critics wrote off Johnny Thunders’ fifth solo outing for sounding too haggard and sloppy. But like Neil Young’s Doom Trilogy, the throw-in-the-towel ethos that went into the making of this 1985 album has slowly fermented over the years, leaving us with something that has aged interestingly well. Thunders had a pretty cool quiver of musicians at his disposal — Black Cats bass player Keith Yon and Drummer Tony St. Helene formed a boozy base guests like Stiv Bators, Patti Palladin, Glen Matlock, and John Perry of Only Ones fame could build on. The sneering “Short Lives” sets the tone with a stumbling swing and semi-anthemic lyrics that humorously champion an irreverent attitude toward mortal longevity. “I Only Wrote This Song for You” transcends punk posturing to create a more mature piano and acoustic guitar ballad with insightful lyrics and a Brooklyn fire escape-flavored saxophone solo. The title track is the life of the party (or hangover) as Thunders desecrates the Doris Day hit by singing drunkenly over an accordion and the young voices of London’s St. Theresa School Choir.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After its release, many critics wrote off Johnny Thunders’ fifth solo outing for sounding too haggard and sloppy. But like Neil Young’s Doom Trilogy, the throw-in-the-towel ethos that went into the making of this 1985 album has slowly fermented over the years, leaving us with something that has aged interestingly well. Thunders had a pretty cool quiver of musicians at his disposal — Black Cats bass player Keith Yon and Drummer Tony St. Helene formed a boozy base guests like Stiv Bators, Patti Palladin, Glen Matlock, and John Perry of Only Ones fame could build on. The sneering “Short Lives” sets the tone with a stumbling swing and semi-anthemic lyrics that humorously champion an irreverent attitude toward mortal longevity. “I Only Wrote This Song for You” transcends punk posturing to create a more mature piano and acoustic guitar ballad with insightful lyrics and a Brooklyn fire escape-flavored saxophone solo. The title track is the life of the party (or hangover) as Thunders desecrates the Doris Day hit by singing drunkenly over an accordion and the young voices of London’s St. Theresa School Choir.

TITLE TIME

More By Johnny Thunders