13 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Plant’s affection for roots music continues on this collaboration with bluegrass superstar Alison Krauss. Together, with producer T Bone Burnett, they explore a variety of roots styles, from the swamp blues of the opener, "Rich Woman," the pedal-steel fueled sorrow of "Killing the Blues" and quiet county desperation of Gene Clark's "Polly Come Home" to the lonesome despair of Townes Van Zandt's "Nothin'."

EDITORS’ NOTES

Robert Plant’s affection for roots music continues on this collaboration with bluegrass superstar Alison Krauss. Together, with producer T Bone Burnett, they explore a variety of roots styles, from the swamp blues of the opener, "Rich Woman," the pedal-steel fueled sorrow of "Killing the Blues" and quiet county desperation of Gene Clark's "Polly Come Home" to the lonesome despair of Townes Van Zandt's "Nothin'."

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5

217 Ratings

217 Ratings

Incredible

manders24

This album is absolutely one of the best I've heard. Being a fan of both Plant and Krauss, I was instantly interested in purchasing the album, completely unaware of how amazing it actually is! These are inspiring songs, and I only wish that everyone listened to it, because it's 100% worth it.

Magical

Eric O

Saw them touring at the Greek @ Berkeley on one of those Bay Area nights where the fog was just rolling over the hills, and it's Robert flippin' Plant, and Allison Krauss' voice just ringing through the amphitheater - so good. Amazing actually. So is the record - if you grab just a few tracks, get "Polly Come Home", "Please Read The Letter", and "Let Your Loss Be A Lesson".

What a duo!

richwr

I think anybody sounds good singing with Alison, but this is a perfect match. Robert Plant has an excellent range in terms of pitch and volume. Your Long Journey is simply beautiful, along with Please Read the Letter and Killing the Blues. And you can't say enough about T-Bone Burnett as a record producer.

About Robert Plant

As Led Zeppelin’s longhaired, bare-chested frontman, Robert Plant was the archetypical rock god. Born in Staffordshire, England, and raised on Delta blues, Plant—as a writer and singer, both with Zep and in his ongoing solo career—braided the visceral impact of hard rock with Eastern classical music, Celtic folk, and mysticism, reshaping rock music not as a vehicle for youth culture, but for myth. A powerful singer who once said he wanted his voice to cut like a tenor sax, Plant also helped define the modern rock vocal—wailing, penetrative—and influenced just about anyone who ever tried to keep rank with an electric guitar, from Jack White and Eddie Vedder to Axl Rose and Chris Cornell. His best '70s turns with Zeppelin remain immortal—has any singer turned the blues inside out the way Plant does on “Black Dog”? But just as interesting are muse-following moments like 1988’s “Tall Cool One,” in which he keeps pace with New Wave, or 2007’s Grammy-winning collaboration with folk singer Alison Krauss, Raising Sand, which revealed a plainspokenness barely hinted at with Zeppelin. Speaking to Musician in 1990, Plant joked that he’d never tried to copy anyone with his voice: “It just developed, until it became the girlish whine that it is today.”

HOMETOWN
Birmingham, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
August 20, 1948

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