12 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 2011 debut is so incredibly crafted that it could do for the ‘80s electro-pop revival what The Strokes and Interpol did for the rebirth of post-punk. Rapprocher abounds with authentically ‘80s-sounding synthesizer soundscapes playing over period-correct drum machines. But what make this album memorable are the well-structured songs loaded with diamond-barbed hooks, as well as Elizabeth Harper’s incredibly powerful and dynamic voice. “Keep You” opens, featuring Harper cooing in an icy, demure manner over Mark Richardson’s music. Richardson builds crystalline keyboard castles with an arsenal of vintage synths at his disposal, but he also injects more relevant distortion and modern effects. This saves Rapprocher from painting itself into a retro corner. Harper also succumbs to timely textures on “Love Me Like You Used To,” sounding like Feist doing a Siouxsie Sioux impersonation. Echoes of early Depeche Mode resonate with “Weekend,” while the squiggling synth lines and deep beats of “Prove Me Wrong” recall a time when Madonna was a burgeoning fixture of New York’s East Village.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 2011 debut is so incredibly crafted that it could do for the ‘80s electro-pop revival what The Strokes and Interpol did for the rebirth of post-punk. Rapprocher abounds with authentically ‘80s-sounding synthesizer soundscapes playing over period-correct drum machines. But what make this album memorable are the well-structured songs loaded with diamond-barbed hooks, as well as Elizabeth Harper’s incredibly powerful and dynamic voice. “Keep You” opens, featuring Harper cooing in an icy, demure manner over Mark Richardson’s music. Richardson builds crystalline keyboard castles with an arsenal of vintage synths at his disposal, but he also injects more relevant distortion and modern effects. This saves Rapprocher from painting itself into a retro corner. Harper also succumbs to timely textures on “Love Me Like You Used To,” sounding like Feist doing a Siouxsie Sioux impersonation. Echoes of early Depeche Mode resonate with “Weekend,” while the squiggling synth lines and deep beats of “Prove Me Wrong” recall a time when Madonna was a burgeoning fixture of New York’s East Village.

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About Class Actress

After logging several years as a coffeehouse singer/songwriter, Elizabeth Harper began focusing on electronic music in 2009 with the help of producers Mark Richardson and Scott Rosenthal. A Philadelphia native, Richardson first appeared on Harper’s radar several years prior, when he remixed a song from her debut album. Harper preferred Richardson’s version to the original, and the two eventually reconvened in Brooklyn, where they began fusing Harper’s pop songs with sampled drumbeats and synthesized instruments. Rosenthal also joined the project, and Class Actress made their studio debut with 2010’s Journal of Ardency, an electro-pop EP that took its cues from Madonna, Depeche Mode, and the fellow Brooklyn-based band Chairlift. After hooking up with Carpark Records, the group released its first album, Rapprocher, in October of 2011. Class Actress signed to Casablanca Records in 2013, and Harper moved to Hollywood seeking a taste of the glamorous life. Casablanca put her in touch with Giorgio Moroder who agreed to executive produce her next recording, but due to scheduling conflicts, the project was delayed indefinitely. In June of 2015, Casablanca finally announced the release of Movies, Class Actress' first EP for the label. ~ Andrew Leahey

ORIGIN
Brooklyn, NY
GENRE
Pop
FORMED
2009

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