10 Songs, 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though the name All Hell implies a raucous soundtrack to a really good barroom brawl, it’s more like a crawl through a nighttime desert, weighed down by a belly full of whiskey and sour beer, along with a crushed soul. If Nick Cave or The National's Matt Berninger hooked up with the ghosts of Ian Curtis and Johnny Cash and watched a 48-hour spaghetti western marathon before going in the studio, All Hell could be the bedeviled result. But it’s actually the debut solo work of one Daughn Gibson, whose time on the road truck driving while listening to dark electronic music like Burial inarguably shaped his musical ID. The title track is a bizarre mash of creeping cello, a vintage cartoon marimba riff, and Gibson’s cavernous baritone, all set to a snapping, spare synthesized backbeat. It paves the way to Daughn’s inarguably strange vision. Yet the opener, “Bad Guys,” suitably points listeners down the dark and brambly path that is All Hell. The weepy, twangy tune reeks of regret, and Gibson’s reverbed vocals exude the sensual allure of Dirty Beaches (as does his use of loops and keyboards). Outstanding.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though the name All Hell implies a raucous soundtrack to a really good barroom brawl, it’s more like a crawl through a nighttime desert, weighed down by a belly full of whiskey and sour beer, along with a crushed soul. If Nick Cave or The National's Matt Berninger hooked up with the ghosts of Ian Curtis and Johnny Cash and watched a 48-hour spaghetti western marathon before going in the studio, All Hell could be the bedeviled result. But it’s actually the debut solo work of one Daughn Gibson, whose time on the road truck driving while listening to dark electronic music like Burial inarguably shaped his musical ID. The title track is a bizarre mash of creeping cello, a vintage cartoon marimba riff, and Gibson’s cavernous baritone, all set to a snapping, spare synthesized backbeat. It paves the way to Daughn’s inarguably strange vision. Yet the opener, “Bad Guys,” suitably points listeners down the dark and brambly path that is All Hell. The weepy, twangy tune reeks of regret, and Gibson’s reverbed vocals exude the sensual allure of Dirty Beaches (as does his use of loops and keyboards). Outstanding.

TITLE TIME
1:57
3:32
4:36
2:33
2:59
3:25
2:30
2:48
2:46
3:52

About Daughn Gibson

Daughn Gibson is a singer/songwriter. His evolving musical style melds old-school, hard country, and classic Americana with a wide array of electronic sounds, from loops and samples to broad synth washes, complex drum programming, and organic instrumentation. Born Josh Martin in 1981, he was deeply influenced by punk rock, Metallica, and Guns N' Roses before reaching his teens. Gibson took up the drums as a preteen and played in local bands Nokturnal Acid and Natal Cream before forming the knotty hard rock unit Pearls & Brass with childhood pals Joel Winter and Randy Huth. Gibson also worked a series of random jobs that influenced his musical view as a solo artist: truck driver, broadcast tower repair technician, warehouse worker, soundman at bars, and retail clerk at an adult bookstore. These experiences culminated in his first solo recording, All Hell, on White Denim. The album married Americana and country sounds he'd heard on the radio (and learned to love while driving a semi) with the electronic sounds that had made an impression on him from listening to European artists such as Demdike Stare and Burial. Gibson signed to Sub Pop in late 2012; his debut for the label, Me Moan, recorded with help from guitarists John Baizley (Baroness) and Jim Elkington (Brokeback), appeared in July 2013. In June 2015, Gibson returned with his third album, Carnation, which eased back on his country influences and filled the spaces with cool electronic pop accents. ~ Thom Jurek

Top Songs by Daughn Gibson

Top Albums by Daughn Gibson

Top Music Videos by Daughn Gibson

Listeners Also Played