9 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

During their stunningly varied and adventurous career, Andy Turner and Ed Handley have issued a string of releases that have shaped the vanguard of British electronic music. With Reachy Prints, Plaid offers a striking follow-up to 2011’s Scintilli, presenting deeply textured electronic grooves, vivid melodies and ethereal production. After opening with the delicate shimmer of “Oh” and the understated, fluttering groove of “Hawkmoth”, the album takes a dark turn with the warped bass synths and lurching, insistent patterns of “Nafovanny”. The blithe “Matin Lunaire” brightens things up, while the duo’s dusky tracks—include the looming, bass-heavy fog of “Ropen” and the funky closer, “Liverpool St”—help make Reachy Prints a rousing success.

EDITORS’ NOTES

During their stunningly varied and adventurous career, Andy Turner and Ed Handley have issued a string of releases that have shaped the vanguard of British electronic music. With Reachy Prints, Plaid offers a striking follow-up to 2011’s Scintilli, presenting deeply textured electronic grooves, vivid melodies and ethereal production. After opening with the delicate shimmer of “Oh” and the understated, fluttering groove of “Hawkmoth”, the album takes a dark turn with the warped bass synths and lurching, insistent patterns of “Nafovanny”. The blithe “Matin Lunaire” brightens things up, while the duo’s dusky tracks—include the looming, bass-heavy fog of “Ropen” and the funky closer, “Liverpool St”—help make Reachy Prints a rousing success.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5

27 Ratings

27 Ratings

Re3aether

Re3aether

Hawkmoth is a great track! Plaid have been even more active than usual, I'm betting all their exploration in sound/technology will result in a fabulous album.

Can't wait for the rest!

No doubt: sure to please

Rest Proof

I've been privileged enough to hear 2 additional new tracks, & by the sounds of those plus Hawkmoth, this album will be raising the bar of excellence as all previous releases. In my eyes, Plaid can do no wrong; they've never let me down.
Counting down to May 20th!!!!

Plaid's best yet

tekkonkinkreet

I’ve been listening to "Reachy Prints" for about a month now and am finding its tracks as beguiling as any of their work. But this time around, Plaid seem to have really perfected the art of making a Plaid album. Of course, that’s a ridiculous statement; "Reachy Prints" is no more or less a Plaid album than their previous collections. What I mean to say is that they seem to have worked out the “formula” for distilling their music down to its essence, its core "Plaid-ness" or "Plaid-ism." Viva Plaid!

About Plaid

Although Plaid pre-existed the association, the duo's Ed Handley and Andy Turner spent most of their early recording years with Ken Downie as the dancefloor-confounding Black Dog Productions. Meshing well with Downie's vision of heavily hybridized post-techno and obscurantist thematics, the pair brought several nascent Plaid tracks to the Black Dog table on the group's debut, Bytes, a collection of tracks recorded by various iterations of the three members. The group recorded several albums and EPs throughout the early and mid-'90s, helping to forge a style of dance music one step removed from the 12" considerations of the average faceless techno act; Handley and Turner's mutual love of early hip-hop contributed BDP's more bawdy, street-level grit.

The pair split from Downie in 1995, and began rechanneling their efforts full-time with an EP on the neo-electro Clear label before signing to Warp. (The pair also recorded an album with European techno figure Mark Broom under the pseudonym Repeat, two tracks of which also made it onto the South of Market EP, released on Jonah Sharp's similarly located Reflective imprint.) Both of Plaid's first two full-lengths, 1998's Not for Threes and the following year's Rest Proof Clockwork, were issued in the U.S. through Nothing. Once Warp set up a home on American shores, however, Plaid made the natural switch with the long-awaited collection Trainer, a retrospective including much of their early, pre-BDP work. Their proper third album, Double Figure, followed in spring 2001, and the handy Plaid remix collection Parts in the Post was issued in 2003 by Peacefrog. The end of the year brought the duo's fourth proper LP, Spokes.

Plaid were quiet on the recording front for several years, finally returning in mid-2006 with Greedy Baby, a mini-album that found the pair co-billed with visual artist Bob Jaroc. Two years later, they made the small leap to recording the soundtrack for Heaven's Door, a Japanese film directed by Michael Arias. In 2011, they returned with Scintilli, released on Warp. Three years later, they nodded to the warmer and more playful sounds of their late-'90s material with Reachy Prints. This was followed by 2016's The Digging Remedy, which revisited the Detroit techno influence of their earliest work. The album featured flute and guitar by guest musician Benet Walsh, who had contributed to most of Plaid's albums since Not for Threes. ~ Sean Cooper

ORIGIN
England
FORMED
1991

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