10 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Portland quartet bequeaths heavy fantasy metal that would well accompany the wielding of fire-forged broadswords, bloody decapitations on snowy battlefields, and ceremonial human sacrifices to Crom the Cimmerian God of Steel. Red Fang’s self-titled debut is a bearded and brutally heavy rock adventure that could cohesively accompany similarly burly albums by Saviours, High On Fire and The Sword. “Prehistoric Dog” rips it open with brain bludgeoning guitars, bone crushing rhythms, and two different sounding singers in Bryan Giles and David Sullivan — the former inflects with a slight nod to James Hetfield’s tortured timbre and the latter with Ozzy Osbourne’s haunted howls — helping give the already sludgy and watery tune “Humans Remain Human Remains” a murky and semi-psychedelic feel (not unlike Black Sabbath’s “Planet Caravan,” especially on the vocals which could’ve been recorded through one of those old rotating Leslie speakers normally used with Hammond organs). If there is one song here more frightening than the rest, it’s “Good to Die,” a no-holds-barred battle anthem sure to rile up even the most pacific of music fans.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This Portland quartet bequeaths heavy fantasy metal that would well accompany the wielding of fire-forged broadswords, bloody decapitations on snowy battlefields, and ceremonial human sacrifices to Crom the Cimmerian God of Steel. Red Fang’s self-titled debut is a bearded and brutally heavy rock adventure that could cohesively accompany similarly burly albums by Saviours, High On Fire and The Sword. “Prehistoric Dog” rips it open with brain bludgeoning guitars, bone crushing rhythms, and two different sounding singers in Bryan Giles and David Sullivan — the former inflects with a slight nod to James Hetfield’s tortured timbre and the latter with Ozzy Osbourne’s haunted howls — helping give the already sludgy and watery tune “Humans Remain Human Remains” a murky and semi-psychedelic feel (not unlike Black Sabbath’s “Planet Caravan,” especially on the vocals which could’ve been recorded through one of those old rotating Leslie speakers normally used with Hammond organs). If there is one song here more frightening than the rest, it’s “Good to Die,” a no-holds-barred battle anthem sure to rile up even the most pacific of music fans.

TITLE TIME
4:28
3:15
3:12
6:28
3:29
3:08
2:49
2:26
4:21
2:37

About Red Fang

Based out of Portland, Oregon, Red Fang captures the loud and fast, anything-goes spirit of classic rock with their heavy stoner-influenced jams. The quartet, consisting of Bryan Giles, Aaron Beam, David Sullivan, and John Sherman, make guitars the focus of their gimmick-free brand of driving rock & roll, eschewing any prog leanings and putting the emphasis on the riffs. The sound is tied together by a sense of punk urgency that spurs the stoner jams into action and gets the songs moving at a raucous gallop. The band made their debut in 2009 with a self-titled album released by Sargent House. For their follow-up, they struck up an unlikely partnership, heading into the studio with producer and multi-instrumentalist for the Decemberists, Chris Funk. The move would pay off for the band, who would release their second album, Murder the Mountains, on Relapse in 2011. The band revisited the partnership again for their third album, Whales and Leeches, which arrived in the fall of 2013. The following year saw the band perform on the Late Show with David Letterman -- musical director Paul Shaffer even sat in with the group -- and in 2016, they released their much anticipated fourth studio LP Only Ghosts, again via Relapse. ~ Gregory Heaney

  • ORIGIN
    Portland, OR
  • FORMED
    2005

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